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January 26, 2010

Q & A with Eliot






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By the time he was 17, Teltscher was ranked in the top 10 nationally in junior rankings.

He was an All-American in his only year at UCLA (1978), which he attended on a tennis scholarship.

That same year he defeated Onny Parun to capture the Benson & Hedges New Zealand Open at Stanley Street, Auckland, in a match best remembered for a controversial overrule midway through the third set.
[edit] Pro career

In 1979, Teltscher turned pro. A worldwide top 10 player from 1980-82, he was ranked no lower than #15 from through 1984. He reached his highest singles ATP-ranking on May 7, 1982, when he became ranked #6 in the world.

He reached the French Open doubles final with partner Terry Moor in 1981, and won the French Open mixed doubles title with Barbara Jordan two years later. He also reached the quarterfinals at the U.S. Open three times (1980, 1981, and 1983 -- losing to Jimmy Connors all three years), and the quarterfinals at the 1983 Australian Open. In March 1987 he beat Connors, ranked # 8 in the world, in Chicago 6-3, 6-1. He won 10 singles titles during his professional career, which ended in 1988.

Looking back at his career, Teltscher expressed pride at the time his honesty took over from his competitive nature. During a match at the Masters Tournament against Vitas Gerulaitis, his racket grazed the net while it was match point. No one, including Gerulitis, was aware of the rule violation except for Teltscher. Rather than let it pass, however, he informed the judges of the infraction and lost the point, and maybe the match, because of his honesty. His parents are most proud of him for that action.
[edit] Davis Cup

Teltscher was on the U.S. Davis Cup team in 1982, 1983, and 1985. He had a combined record of 5-4 in singles play, and helped the U.S. win the Davis Cup in 1982 over France.


January 25, 2010

Analyzing a Stroke






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Paul Roetert is the Managing Director of the United States Tennis Association's Player Development Program. In addition, he serves as Tournament Director of the U.S. Open Junior Tennis Championships. Before re-joining the USTA in November, 2001, Paul spent two years as the Executive Director of the American Sport Education Program. Prior to that position he spent eleven years as the Administrator of Sport Science for the USTA where he developed the sport science program. He also served as Vice Chairman of the sport science committee.

Paul has published extensively in the field of tennis, including two books, 16 book chapters and over 100 articles. He is a Fellow in the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), a member of the United States Professional Tennis Association (USPTA) and the Professional Registry (PTR). In 1998 he received the PTR's Plagenhoef Award for sport science; in 1999 the Editorial Excellence Award from the National Strength and Conditioning Association for his work on the Journal of Strength and Conditioning and Research; in 2000 the Outstanding Alumni award from the University of Connecticut. He is also the 2002 Educational Merit Award recipient from the International Tennis Hall of Fame for outstanding service to the game of tennis.

Paul holds a Ph.D. in biomechanics from the University of Connecticut. Originally from the Netherlands, he and his wife Barbara reside in Miami, Florida.


January 11, 2010

Whole or Part Method






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School explains the "Whole" and "Part" method of teaching. According to Dr. Paul Salitsky, the newer research suggests that we should be using the "Whole" method as opposed to the "Part" method. Paul is a lecturer in Sports & Exercise Psychology, Motor Learning, Neurobiology, Physiology & Behavior and Exercise Biology at US Davis.

In this video, we break down the forehand groundstroke. One commonality of all the world-class players today is that the majority of them use the "Whole" method of a circular loop backswing on both the forehand and backhand sides.

This elliptical swing pattern allows the racket head speed to increase throughout the swing. Because players today position themselves a little farther back behind the baseline than in previous years, the shorter backswings do not generate enough velocity to keep the ball deep into the court.


January 4, 2010

Sideways-move together. Up & back-move apart.






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By the time he was 17, Teltscher was ranked in the top 10 nationally in junior rankings.

He was an All-American in his only year at UCLA (1978), which he attended on a tennis scholarship.

That same year he defeated Onny Parun to capture the Benson & Hedges New Zealand Open at Stanley Street, Auckland, in a match best remembered for a controversial overrule midway through the third set.
[edit] Pro career

In 1979, Teltscher turned pro. A worldwide top 10 player from 1980-82, he was ranked no lower than #15 from through 1984. He reached his highest singles ATP-ranking on May 7, 1982, when he became ranked #6 in the world.

He reached the French Open doubles final with partner Terry Moor in 1981, and won the French Open mixed doubles title with Barbara Jordan two years later. He also reached the quarterfinals at the U.S. Open three times (1980, 1981, and 1983 -- losing to Jimmy Connors all three years), and the quarterfinals at the 1983 Australian Open. In March 1987 he beat Connors, ranked # 8 in the world, in Chicago 6-3, 6-1. He won 10 singles titles during his professional career, which ended in 1988.

Looking back at his career, Teltscher expressed pride at the time his honesty took over from his competitive nature. During a match at the Masters Tournament against Vitas Gerulaitis, his racket grazed the net while it was match point. No one, including Gerulitis, was aware of the rule violation except for Teltscher. Rather than let it pass, however, he informed the judges of the infraction and lost the point, and maybe the match, because of his honesty. His parents are most proud of him for that action.
[edit] Davis Cup

Teltscher was on the U.S. Davis Cup team in 1982, 1983, and 1985. He had a combined record of 5-4 in singles play, and helped the U.S. win the Davis Cup in 1982 over France.