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February 2, 2014

Switching from a two-handed backhand to one







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Making the switch from a two-handed backhand to one.

June 2, 2012

One-handed Backhand Resurgence







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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School shows the trend of the current one-handed backhand resurgence.

March 16, 2011

Kevin Kim's Backhand






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu, HI comments on the conservative grip that ATP Player Kevin Kim uses in today's current game. Kevin holds the grip on the backhand side in between the continental and eastern backhand grip. With this grip he is able to generate good topspin by using a full arm circle follow through and also can rip the ball flat or take the ball early. Kevin's backhand grip is much different than many of the one-handed European clay court player's who use a more extreme eastern backhand grip. So, if you are blessed with good hard-court instincts, try using the more conservative hammer grip to rip into your one handed backhand.

Dennis Ralston's six keys to hitting the backhand:

1. Make sure you have proper balance. Don't lean to far forward as it will end up hitting the ball into the net.

2. Keep the right shoulder up to prevent yourself from leaning too far forward.

3. Reach back with your opposite arm to ensure a backswing that is long enough. If you take too short a backswing, you won't build up momentum; you will brush up and over the ball and it won't go anywhere.

4. Don't think about transferring your weight forward. If you are on balance and let the racket head go through the path of the ball, that is all you need worry about. The weight transfer will take care of itself. If you think too much as you are about to meet the ball, it will only hurt you. Don't try too hard to move your weight into the shot, because you'll end up muscling the ball instead of stroking it.

5. Make contact just in front of your body and get your feet into position. If you have time, your feet should be parallel with the baseline.

6. Follow through out toward your target. For topspin, your racket head should finish higher than it would on a flat backhand.

May 10, 2010

Backhand Slice (Part 4)






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In this video, Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu, Hawaii shows comparisons in the wrist position and follow through in the one handed backhand slice.


May 8, 2010

Backhand Slice (Part 3)







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In this video, Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu, Hawaii shows comparisons in the contact point and follow through in the one handed backhand slice.


May 6, 2010

Backhand Slice (Part 2)






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In this video, Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu, Hawaii shows comparisons in the feet placement and shoulder turn in the one handed backhand slice.

May 4, 2010

Backhand Slice (Part 1)






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In this video, Lee Couillard, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu, Hawaii shows the difference in the techniques of the one handed backhand slice. Comparisons are made between the one handed backhand players and two handed backhand players.

September 2, 2009

Two Handed Backhand Grips (Part 2)






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Bernard Gusman, USPTA, Tennis Director, Punahou School, USTA High Performance Coach, Honolulu Hawaii shows the different grips used for the two-handed backhand. In this video he discusses the following different grips:

Left Hand - Eastern Right Hand- Eastern (fh) Level- Beginner Player: Evert
Left Hand - Eastern Right Hand-Continental Level- Beginner/Adv Player: Safin,
Left Hand - Eastern Right Hand- Eastern (bh) Level- Adv Player: Roddick
Left Hand - Semi-W Right Hand- Eastern (bh) Level- Adv Player: Safina
Left Hand - Semi-W Right Hand- Continental Level- Adv Player: Nadal
Left Hand - Cont Right Hand- Eastern (fh) Level- Adv Player: Baghdatis
Left Hand - Eastern(fh) Right Hand- Semi-W Level- Adv Player: S. Williams

August 31, 2009

Two Handed Backhand Grips (Part 1)






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Bernard Gusman, USPTA, Tennis Director, Punahou School, USTA High Performance Coach, Honolulu Hawaii shows the different grips used for the two-handed backhand. In this video he discusses the following different grips:

Left Hand - Eastern Right Hand- Eastern (fh) Level- Beginner Player: Evert
Left Hand - Eastern Right Hand-Continental Level- Beginner/Adv Player: Safin
Left Hand - Eastern Right Hand- Eastern (bh) Level- Adv Player: Roddick
Left Hand - Semi-W Right Hand- Eastern (bh) Level- Adv Player: Safina
Left Hand - Semi-W Right Hand- Continental Level- Adv Player: Nadal
Left Hand - Cont Right Hand- Eastern (fh) Level- Adv Player: Baghdatis
Left Hand - Eastern(fh) Right Hand- Semi-W Level- Adv Player: S. Williams

May 29, 2009

Extreme Eastern Backhand






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu, Hawaii shows a backhand comparison between Marcos Daniel and "Guga" of Brazil. Daniel and Guga have the same coach and they both use an Extreme Backhand grip.


March 20, 2009

Classic vs Current Slice






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Pro, Punahou School shows a comparison of the Classic vs Current backhand slice in todayʻs game.

October 24, 2008

Backhand one-handed topspin







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Neil Archer, USPTA, shows a tip on how to hit the one handed windshield wiper backhand. This video was taken at the 2008 USPTA Hawaii Convention as a part of the Nano Presentations.

Neil Archer:

TRAINING/TEACHING HISTORY: 1996 USPTA Certified P3 Level Instructor. 2000 USPTA P2 Certification Upgrade . 2002 USPTA Northern California Division Vice President, 2nd Place Finish USPTA National Seminar Contest. 2003 USPTA Nor Cal Associate Pro of the Year, Continuing Education Award and P1 Level Instructor Upgrade. Coordinator of Friday Night Live Indoor Sports Arena and Tutoring facility for underprivileged children, Assistant Tennis Professional Millennium Sports Club, Fairfield, CA. 2004 USPTA Northern California Regional Vice President, Continuing Education Award, Head Pro Millennium Sports Club, 6.0 and 7.0 Level USTA Team Coach-Sectional Finish, and Voted USPTA Nor Cal Pro of the Year. 2005 USPTA Northern California Division President, Continuing Education Award, Director of Tennis Yuba City Parks and Recreation. 2006 USPTA Northern California Division President, USPTA National Awards Committee, USTA 16's Zonal Championships Coach, Director of Tennis Yuba City Parks and Recreation, Head Coach River Valley High School Boy's and Girl's Teams, Independent Tennis Teaching Professional and High Performance Coach for several Nor Cal USTA top juniors. 2007 Moved to Hawaii-Head Teaching Professional Wailea Tennis Club, Maui, HI.

June 12, 2008

Two handed backhand






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu, Hawaii shows examples of the two-handed backhand; the Eastern/Eastern (good for beginners), the Eastern/Continental (good for advanced players) and the Semi-western/Eastern backhand (good for advanced players who want to generate topspin.)

June 8, 2008

Myth: "Watch the ball"






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School explains the "MYTH" about watching the ball hit the strings of the racquet. Also, as reported in Sports Illustrated, the Punahou Boys tennis team has won the state high school championships 40 times and the girls 34 times since 1958.

May 23rd, 2008 by Wes Nakama - The Honolulu Advertiser

OK, I finally got my hands on the Sports Illustrated issue with the article featuring Punahou as the nation's No. 1 athletic program out of more than 38,000 high schools in the United States of America.

BTW, I was puzzled as to how the rest of the country had the issue on their newsstands Wednesday but even at 7:30 p.m. Thursday it was nowhere to be found at Borders Ward Centre or Barnes & Noble Ala Moana. The copy I have is on loan, from the bunch FedExed to Punahou from SI's offices in New York.

I don't subscribe, and my dad canceled his subsciption in March after more than 50 years (no time for us to read it as much nowdays).

Anyway, I wanted to wait until reading the article and seeing the actual layout in the hard copy (instead of just reading the on-line version) before commenting on it as a blog topic.

Overall, I think SI did a pretty good job educating the country on what Punahou is all about. The two-page introductory photo spread was fantastic, and reporter Austin Murphy seemed to grasp both the big picture and the minute details and put them together for a concise, well-written story.

I also give SI credit for legitimizing Punahou's achievements, because I'm sure there are readers in New York or Texas or Florida who might question how hard it is to win a state championship in Hawai'i. Some in those states or Michigan or Ohio or Pennsylvania might equate a Hawai'i state championship as being the champ in Guam, or Rhode Island or Alaska.

Which brings me to why I think Punahou is worthy of the ranking, and why my only big regret with the story is I wish the reporter and photographer also got to spend some time at Kamehameha, 'Iolani or even Mililani. As impressive as Punahou is academically, athletically and campus-wise, I don't think those three schools are too far behind.

HHSAA executive director Keith Amemiya suggested as much with his comments in Tuesday's Advertiser article, but at least one person has told me they thought his comments had no merit.

But honestly, I would have to agree with Amemiya that Punahou would not be No. 1 if Kamehameha, 'Iolani, Saint Louis, Mid-Pacific or even Mililani, Baldwin or Waiakea were not giving the Buffanblu serious competition in nearly every sport across the board. Punahou has to strive and maximize its performances, otherwise they'll lose.
The article portrays Punahou as the ultimate destination for prospective athletes and students, which might be true, but it ignores the fact that Kamehameha is statistically harder to get into, or that 'Iolani's selectivity in admissions is more than comparable.
If Punahou is indeed the "Harvard of Hawai'i" that a lot of parents want to send their kid to, as Kapolei football coach Darren Hernandez is quoted as saying in the article, then what does that make 'Iolani, which annually produces twice as many National Merit semifinalists with half the enrollment?

This is no knock on Punahou, because there is no question it is an outstanding school with a fantastic athletic program. I think it deserves the No. 1 ranking, but other schools in Hawai'i are not very far behind.

Punahou is No. 1 largely because it has to compete in girls volleyball against Kamehameha, which was ranked No. 3 in the nation last season. It has to compete in boys basketball with 'Iolani, which won seven of the past eight ILH chmpionships. It has to compete in football with Saint Louis, which has won 21 of the past 24 league titles.

It has to compete against athletes like Derrick Low, Brian Ching, Jonathan Spiker.
When your competition is that good, it forces you to raise your bar, train harder and play your best.

So, I agree that the No. 1 ranking is deserving, and I also think Hawai'i's overall competition level helped Punahou get there.

December 16, 2007

Outside leg closer






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Dave Porter, EdD, USPTA Master Professional explains the movement of the outside leg on the open stance forehand and backhand groundstroke.

December 2, 2007

Lazy Slice







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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Professional, Punahou School demonstrates a one handed backhand slice. In this drill he uses a bench to make the student hit under and out to prevent the ball from popping up. The one handed backhand slice should not be confused with the one handed backhand chip.

July 31, 2007

One Handed Backhand

Lee Couillard, USPTA, Wilson Team Member, Balle de Match Team member demonstrates the one handed backhand. I had a two handed backhand and switched to a one hand when I was a junior player. I would suggest video taping your backhand if you are attempting to self teach yourself this stroke as I did. The Eastern backhand grip is used for topspin, however, you will have to be flexible with changing grips for the combination of underspin and topspin. Please be patient while the movie downloads...


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June 13, 2007

Backhand Trend






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One handed backhands are the trend in today's modern game. Please wait, loading.....

November 12, 2006

Frisbee Throw

Ashok Bikkannavar and Julie Le coach this young 11 year old prodigy from Vietnam. Ashok used a frisbee for 3 months to change Thien from a 2 handed backhand to a one hand.

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November 5, 2006

Angular Momentum

David T. Porter Ed.D., USPTA Master Professional, HEAD Advisory Staff Member and Head Men's and Women's Tennis Coach for BYU-Hawaii talks about rotating and swinging on the modern forehand and backhand.

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November 1, 2006

Back Fence Followthrough

Scott DiSalvo, Wailea Tennis Club, USPTA, PRINCE Team Member gives a short tip on correcting an excessive followthrough.

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October 22, 2006

Backswing Tip

Randy Kop, Director of Tennis at the Waialae Country Club gives a quick tip on the backswing.

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July 6, 2006

One handed backhands

A collection of superb one handed backhands.


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May 1, 2006

Stringless racket tip

Ann Pangan, USPTA Honolulu, HI. Ann uses two rackets to demonstrate shoulder turn on ground stroke.


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