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June 5, 2012

Running Doubles Drill







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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School shows a fun doubles drill.

September 1, 2010

Offense Defense Doubles Drill







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Rusty Komori, USPTA, Head Boys Varsity Coach, demonstrates the "Offense - Defense Doubles Drill."

From MIDWEEK MAGAZINE

After 20 straight state titles, 17 under tennis coach Rusty Komori, Punahou is the most dominant prep team in U.S. history.

Forget the New York Yankees, Los Angeles Lakers and the footballers from Brazil. If you want to see real dominance, go visit the hard courts of Manoa, where the Punahou Buffanblu have held sway on the rest of the Hawaii tennis world for the past two decades.

That's right, in May they won their 20th straight state title. And counting.

The advent of the Internet and cell phones for everyone, and a pair of Bushes in the White House, and still every school year ends the same: another state tennis championship for the Punahou boys.

Trivia: What was the last other team to win the state title? Lahainaluna, in 1990. Before that, Punahou won the previous seven, meaning it's won 27 of the past 28 titles, and since 1969, 35 of 42. Michael Gearen started the current streak as coach in 1991-92, and then Bernard Gusman coached one year before Komori took over for the past 17 - and counting.

Komori is a 1987 Damien graduate who didn't take up tennis seriously until his sophomore year. But once he began his love affair with that fuzzy little yellow ball, he hasn't looked back.

"The reason I went to tennis, I really liked the team sports, but with tennis, if you want to be good, it all depends on you," says Komori, who started out playing baseball and soccer. "If you want to be bad, it only depends on you as well! That's a good thing. You just have to hit it in one more time than your opponent."

He graduated high school ranked fourth in the state and went on to accept one of the first tennis scholarships offered by Creighton University in Omaha, Neb., where he earned a degree in communications with the intention of continuing on to law school.

But a funny thing happened on the way to the courthouse. He began working as a pro at Waialae Country Club where, as you might imagine, a lot of members are lawyers. As he helped them with their ground strokes, he began to notice many of them were wearing thick glasses, so he asked them what they did all day as lawyers.

"They said, 'Read,'" says Komori. "I knew I didn't want to read things. I didn't want to read all day, so I stuck with tennis and so far, no glasses!"

As a leader of young men, Komori maintains his own style: He is neither bombastic nor authoritarian, but rather exudes a cool, quiet confidence that his players respect. He leads with his actions. Stressing the importance of fitness, he often runs laps with his boys before they ever take to the court.

"I always tell my captains, 'You need to lead by example,'" says Komori, a confirmed bachelor who keeps in shape by running with a 2-year-old Maltese named, wait for it, Ace. "And if they need to, then I need to as well. You can do 99 things right, but if we do one thing wrong, everyone will remember that one thing. So we cannot allow ourselves to do any one thing wrong. That's why I stress self-discipline."

By keeping his rules simple, there is little confusion on what he expects from his players.

"I have two rules for varsity: listening and lateness," says Komori. "Parents like my rules because that's something they want instilled in their kids. I instill self-discipline, respect for the opponent, I try to have them be the best representative of themselves, the program and Punahou School.

"I want them to become really good people beyond high school. Tennis and the adversities they face in it prepares them for life outside of high school."


Komori has a keen awareness that most of his students will not follow his lead and make a career out of tennis. For some, it will lead to college scholarships, but for the majority it will become a recreational diversion and as the years pile on, a way to keep off unwanted pounds and keep the ticker strong.

He understands that he is not shaping their lives, but enriching them. This is a lesson he learned from his old mentor and current colleague Rick Aquino at Mililani Recreational Center.

"Rick once told me, 'You are going to need more than I can give,'" recalls Komori. "What he meant by that was he didn't want to just keep me for himself, but rather he was looking at me developing as a person, and he was adding to me.

"If there were other coaches or tennis clinics that would add to me, then that would be fine. So I look at my players not as my players, but rather how can I add to that player's development? How can other pros add to it? It's hard for one pro to be there all the time. If we all share this philosophy then all the players can flourish."

Once the physical work-out for the day is done, he likes to leave players with championship thoughts such as "Challenges make life interesting, overcoming them makes life meaningful." And this one from Arthur Ashe: "You never play an opponent, you are playing yourself and your own highest standards."

Ashe's words ring especially true with Komori as he has to remotivate himself every year to stay hungry and keep the streak alive.

"Every year it seems like someone is saying, 'You have to beat this record or that record,'" says Komori, who passed Cal Lee's record two years ago for the most consecutive state championships. "It's a lot of pressure, but only you can give yourself pressure and you can feed on it, channel it - and suddenly it becomes exciting."

August 29, 2010

Doubles reflex volley game







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Rusty Komori, USPTA, Head Boys Varsity Coach, demonstrates the "Doubles Reflex Volley Game."

From MIDWEEK MAGAZINE

After 20 straight state titles, 17 under tennis coach Rusty Komori, Punahou is the most dominant prep team in U.S. history.

Forget the New York Yankees, Los Angeles Lakers and the footballers from Brazil. If you want to see real dominance, go visit the hard courts of Manoa, where the Punahou Buffanblu have held sway on the rest of the Hawaii tennis world for the past two decades.

That's right, in May they won their 20th straight state title. And counting.

The advent of the Internet and cell phones for everyone, and a pair of Bushes in the White House, and still every school year ends the same: another state tennis championship for the Punahou boys.

Trivia: What was the last other team to win the state title? Lahainaluna, in 1990. Before that, Punahou won the previous seven, meaning it's won 27 of the past 28 titles, and since 1969, 35 of 42. Michael Gearen started the current streak as coach in 1991-92, and then Bernard Gusman coached one year before Komori took over for the past 17 - and counting.

Komori is a 1987 Damien graduate who didn't take up tennis seriously until his sophomore year. But once he began his love affair with that fuzzy little yellow ball, he hasn't looked back.

"The reason I went to tennis, I really liked the team sports, but with tennis, if you want to be good, it all depends on you," says Komori, who started out playing baseball and soccer. "If you want to be bad, it only depends on you as well! That's a good thing. You just have to hit it in one more time than your opponent."

He graduated high school ranked fourth in the state and went on to accept one of the first tennis scholarships offered by Creighton University in Omaha, Neb., where he earned a degree in communications with the intention of continuing on to law school.

But a funny thing happened on the way to the courthouse. He began working as a pro at Waialae Country Club where, as you might imagine, a lot of members are lawyers. As he helped them with their ground strokes, he began to notice many of them were wearing thick glasses, so he asked them what they did all day as lawyers.

"They said, 'Read,'" says Komori. "I knew I didn't want to read things. I didn't want to read all day, so I stuck with tennis and so far, no glasses!"

As a leader of young men, Komori maintains his own style: He is neither bombastic nor authoritarian, but rather exudes a cool, quiet confidence that his players respect. He leads with his actions. Stressing the importance of fitness, he often runs laps with his boys before they ever take to the court.

"I always tell my captains, 'You need to lead by example,'" says Komori, a confirmed bachelor who keeps in shape by running with a 2-year-old Maltese named, wait for it, Ace. "And if they need to, then I need to as well. You can do 99 things right, but if we do one thing wrong, everyone will remember that one thing. So we cannot allow ourselves to do any one thing wrong. That's why I stress self-discipline."

By keeping his rules simple, there is little confusion on what he expects from his players.

"I have two rules for varsity: listening and lateness," says Komori. "Parents like my rules because that's something they want instilled in their kids. I instill self-discipline, respect for the opponent, I try to have them be the best representative of themselves, the program and Punahou School.

"I want them to become really good people beyond high school. Tennis and the adversities they face in it prepares them for life outside of high school."


Komori has a keen awareness that most of his students will not follow his lead and make a career out of tennis. For some, it will lead to college scholarships, but for the majority it will become a recreational diversion and as the years pile on, a way to keep off unwanted pounds and keep the ticker strong.

He understands that he is not shaping their lives, but enriching them. This is a lesson he learned from his old mentor and current colleague Rick Aquino at Mililani Recreational Center.

"Rick once told me, 'You are going to need more than I can give,'" recalls Komori. "What he meant by that was he didn't want to just keep me for himself, but rather he was looking at me developing as a person, and he was adding to me.

"If there were other coaches or tennis clinics that would add to me, then that would be fine. So I look at my players not as my players, but rather how can I add to that player's development? How can other pros add to it? It's hard for one pro to be there all the time. If we all share this philosophy then all the players can flourish."

Once the physical work-out for the day is done, he likes to leave players with championship thoughts such as "Challenges make life interesting, overcoming them makes life meaningful." And this one from Arthur Ashe: "You never play an opponent, you are playing yourself and your own highest standards."

Ashe's words ring especially true with Komori as he has to remotivate himself every year to stay hungry and keep the streak alive.

"Every year it seems like someone is saying, 'You have to beat this record or that record,'" says Komori, who passed Cal Lee's record two years ago for the most consecutive state championships. "It's a lot of pressure, but only you can give yourself pressure and you can feed on it, channel it - and suddenly it becomes exciting."

November 27, 2009

Keep It Low






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By the time he was 17, Teltscher was ranked in the top 10 nationally in junior rankings.

He was an All-American in his only year at UCLA (1978), which he attended on a tennis scholarship.

That same year he defeated Onny Parun to capture the Benson & Hedges New Zealand Open at Stanley Street, Auckland, in a match best remembered for a controversial overrule midway through the third set.
[edit] Pro career

In 1979, Teltscher turned pro. A worldwide top 10 player from 1980-82, he was ranked no lower than #15 from through 1984. He reached his highest singles ATP-ranking on May 7, 1982, when he became ranked #6 in the world.

He reached the French Open doubles final with partner Terry Moor in 1981, and won the French Open mixed doubles title with Barbara Jordan two years later. He also reached the quarterfinals at the U.S. Open three times (1980, 1981, and 1983 -- losing to Jimmy Connors all three years), and the quarterfinals at the 1983 Australian Open. In March 1987 he beat Connors, ranked # 8 in the world, in Chicago 6-3, 6-1. He won 10 singles titles during his professional career, which ended in 1988.

Looking back at his career, Teltscher expressed pride at the time his honesty took over from his competitive nature. During a match at the Masters Tournament against Vitas Gerulaitis, his racket grazed the net while it was match point. No one, including Gerulitis, was aware of the rule violation except for Teltscher. Rather than let it pass, however, he informed the judges of the infraction and lost the point, and maybe the match, because of his honesty. His parents are most proud of him for that action.
[edit] Davis Cup

Teltscher was on the U.S. Davis Cup team in 1982, 1983, and 1985. He had a combined record of 5-4 in singles play, and helped the U.S. win the Davis Cup in 1982 over France.


November 25, 2009

Doubles Shot Tolerance







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By the time he was 17, Teltscher was ranked in the top 10 nationally in junior rankings.

He was an All-American in his only year at UCLA (1978), which he attended on a tennis scholarship.

That same year he defeated Onny Parun to capture the Benson & Hedges New Zealand Open at Stanley Street, Auckland, in a match best remembered for a controversial overrule midway through the third set.
[edit] Pro career

In 1979, Teltscher turned pro. A worldwide top 10 player from 1980-82, he was ranked no lower than #15 from through 1984. He reached his highest singles ATP-ranking on May 7, 1982, when he became ranked #6 in the world.

He reached the French Open doubles final with partner Terry Moor in 1981, and won the French Open mixed doubles title with Barbara Jordan two years later. He also reached the quarterfinals at the U.S. Open three times (1980, 1981, and 1983 -- losing to Jimmy Connors all three years), and the quarterfinals at the 1983 Australian Open. In March 1987 he beat Connors, ranked # 8 in the world, in Chicago 6-3, 6-1. He won 10 singles titles during his professional career, which ended in 1988.

Looking back at his career, Teltscher expressed pride at the time his honesty took over from his competitive nature. During a match at the Masters Tournament against Vitas Gerulaitis, his racket grazed the net while it was match point. No one, including Gerulitis, was aware of the rule violation except for Teltscher. Rather than let it pass, however, he informed the judges of the infraction and lost the point, and maybe the match, because of his honesty. His parents are most proud of him for that action.
[edit] Davis Cup

Teltscher was on the U.S. Davis Cup team in 1982, 1983, and 1985. He had a combined record of 5-4 in singles play, and helped the U.S. win the Davis Cup in 1982 over France.


October 7, 2009

Doubles Insight (Part 2)






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Katrina Adams is part of the on-air broadcasting team at Tennis Channel. Since joining the network in 2003, she has been the lead analyst for coverage of the International Tennis Federation's Fed Cup competition. Her duties have also extended to analysis during live Women's Tennis Association (WTA) Tour coverage and hosting the "Fed Cup Preview" show.

A professional tennis player from 1988 to 1999, Adams captured 20 WTA Tour doubles titles and one ITF singles crown during her career. Her career-high world rankings included No. 8 in doubles and No. 67 in singles in 1989.

Adams segued into broadcasting and coaching following her career as a player. Her television career began as a commentator for BET's coverage of the United Negro College Fund Celebrity Golf and Tennis Challenge from 1998-2001. She also provided analysis on the international feeds of the 1999 Pilot Pen and Lipton Championships and ESPN's coverage of the 1999 Bausch and Lomb Championships. Further, she has been interviewed for such programs as "ESPN Sports Century" and Lifetime's "Intimate Portrait." In the coaching arena, from 1999-2002, Adams served as a national tennis coach for the United States Tennis Association (USTA), coaching and mentoring junior and professional tennis players in all aspects of their careers. During that time, she also served as a member of the USTA Player Development Committee (1999) and the USTA Executive Committee (1998-99). In 2005, Adams was elected to the USTA Board of Directors as a Director at Large.

Off the courts, Adams has helped provide strategic direction for the WTA Tour and professional women players worldwide, serving four one-year terms as a player representative on the WTA Tour Board of Directors and participating in the integration of the WTA Tour, ITF and Players Association. She also served five two-year terms on the WTA Tour Players Association Board of Directors, in the posts of vice president and treasurer, serving as chairperson of the Anti-Doping Committee, and receiving the WTA Tour Player Service Award in 1996 and 1997.

Born and raised in Chicago, Adams started playing tennis at the age of six, in the public parks and recreation program sponsored by the Martin Luther King Jr. Boys Club. She earned an athletic scholarship to Northwestern University, where she studied communications and became the 1986 ITCA Rookie of the Year and 1987 NCAA doubles champion en route to garnering two-time NCAA All-America honors. In 1998, she was inducted into the Northwestern University Hall of Fame. She currently lives in Bradenton, Fla.


Zina Lynna Garrison (born November 16, 1963 in Houston, Texas) is a former professional tennis player from the United States. During her career, she was a women's singles runner-up at Wimbledon in 1990, a three-time Grand Slam mixed doubles champion, and a women's doubles gold medalist at the 1988 Olympic Games.

March 27, 2009

Closing in drill






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu, Hawaii shows a great "High - Low Ball" doubles drill to get your students to "Close" into the net. Many players never realize when to sprint into the net and pick off a volley. This drill makes the students aware of when they should close in and attack.

January 13, 2009

"Peg" Drill






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School has the Punahou Intermediate Girls Tennis team do the "Peg" drill. Peg (definition) - a fast accurate throw.

November 4, 2008

Changing gears






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Dave Porter, Ed.D., Menʻs and Womenʻs Head Tennis Coach - BYU, Hawaii shows a doubles drill by Emilio Sanchez-Vicario from the Sanchez-Casal Academy in Barcelona, Spain. This doubles drill emphasizes closing off the net using explosive speed. This is an advanced doubles drill with two players stationed at the net to remove stray balls that are hit in the net.

April 20, 2008

Triples







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Laura Gilbert, USPTA, conducts one of the "Top Ten Games" everyone should know called "Triples." This video is from the RCW held in Austin, TX.

Laura is from the USTA Texas section.

Role with the USTA: Advisor/Consultant.

CTA Experience: Founded a CTA, CTA BoardMember, CTA Volunteer/Member, Advisor/Consultant to a CTA_Areas of Expertise: Strategic Planning, Strategic Communication, Personnel Management, Community and Public Relations, Marketing, Advertising and Promotion, Parks and Recreation, Special Events, Meeting Planning, Development, USTA Programming, Other Tennis Programming
A USPTA Professional 1, Laura Gilbert has over 25 years of coaching experience including middle school, high school and college.

Currently, Laura is the director and administrator for the Texas 76ers and the USTA High Performance Competative Training Center at a facility that works with 50-75 of the highest ranked juniors in the nation. Laura is also the director of tennis at Arlington Tennis Center, a 20-court public facility, where she manages a staff of 23.

From 2000-2004, Laura helped develop and strengthen 27 community tennis associations for USTA Texas as the community coordinator for North Texas.
In the 1990s, Laura was the director of tennis at Solana Club and became the founder and president of the North East Tarrant Tennis Association (NETT).

In college, Laura played on a scholarship for the University of Texas-Austin. She also competed on the professional tour in the mid-1970s. Laura is also a member of the Head Advisory Staff, a USTA Certified Official, a USTA Recreational Coach Trainer, and was named the 2004 USPTA Texas Section Facility Manager of the Year.

January 19, 2008

GO! Drill






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School demonstrates the "Go" drill with the Intermediate Girls Tennis Team at Punahou School. The "Go" drill is one of the best all around doubles drills there is in the game of tennis. It requires players to run into the net from any position on the court and attempt a volley.


January 17, 2008

All Position Doubles Drill







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Mike Carter, PTR/USPTA is the Director of Community Development for the USTA Texas Section. Here he explains the "All Position Doubles" drill at a recent USTA Recreational Coaches Workshop held in Austin, TX. The benefit of this game is to play points from all positions on the court and to have players moving constantly. By using the 60' court, players immediately are put in position to volley.

April 18, 2007

Doubles VanDrillen






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John Nelson, University of Hawaii Men's Tennis Coach shows a doubles VanDrillen Drill with two players at the net and two at the baseline.


April 13, 2007

VanDrillen






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John Nelson, University of Hawaii Men's Tennis Coach shows a singles and doubles drill called "Van Drillen". Erik Van Dillen and Stan Smith were a top doubles team back in the late 60's and early 70's.

April 1, 2007

Dink "em"







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Some Punahou Varisty Boys tennis players demonstrate a fun game of Dink "em"
The game can be played with 2 or 4 players.

January 12, 2007

Super Simple

Bernard Gusman, Director of Tennis, Punahou School, Wilson TEAM Member shows a super simple doubles drill by Zina Garrison from the Tennis Teachers Conference at the US Open In New York.

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November 30, 2006

Hot Box Drill

Jerry Cape, USPTA, USRSA, Tecnifibre TEAM shows a drill good for improving doubles play using poaching/intercepting. Ideally there should be eight players (four on each side) as ONLY the lone net player on each team can score. All other players rotate in-and-out after an error is made. Other rules are no lobbing, no points lost when the volleyer misses and when any of the baseline players hit an error or a winner. Again, points are awarded ONLY when the net player hits a winning volley.

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July 30, 2006

Learning "I" Formation

Lee Couillard, USPTA, Wilson TEAM Member. Punahou 7th and 8th graders learn the I formation in doubles for the first time.


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