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March 28, 2013

Western Grip & RHS







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DR. MARK KOVACS, PhD., CSCS
Senior Manager of Strength & Conditioning/Sports Science
USTA Training Center in Boca Raton, FL

Dr. Kovacs was an accomplished player and coach before transitioning to a career as a sport science expert. As a player he was a collegiate All-American and NCAA champion at Auburn University. He has a Masters degree in Exercise Science from Auburn and a Ph.D. in Exercise Physiology from The University of Alabama. Dr. Kovacs is an Associate Editor of the Strength and Conditioning Journal and co-author of tennis book titled "Tennis Training-Enhancing On-Court Performance". Mark is a certified strength and conditioning specialist through the NSCA, certified Health/Fitness Instructor through the American College of Sports Medicine, USPTA certified coach and United States Track and Field Level II Sprints Coach. Before starting with the USTA, Mark was an Assistant Professor of Exercise Science and Wellness at Jacksonville State University.

May 25, 2012

Gravity Drop Swinging







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Fred Wong, USPTA, Punahou School shows a gravity-drop swinging exercise to help with learning the loop forehand.


May 11, 2012

Slice Forehand Approach






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DR. MARK KOVACS, PhD., CSCS
Senior Manager of Strength & Conditioning/Sports Science
USTA Training Center in Boca Raton, FL

Dr. Kovacs was an accomplished player and coach before transitioning to a career as a sport science expert. As a player he was a collegiate All-American and NCAA champion at Auburn University. He has a Masters degree in Exercise Science from Auburn and a Ph.D. in Exercise Physiology from The University of Alabama. Dr. Kovacs is an Associate Editor of the Strength and Conditioning Journal and co-author of tennis book titled "Tennis Training-Enhancing On-Court Performance". Mark is a certified strength and conditioning specialist through the NSCA, certified Health/Fitness Instructor through the American College of Sports Medicine, USPTA certified coach and United States Track and Field Level II Sprints Coach. Before starting with the USTA, Mark was an Assistant Professor of Exercise Science and Wellness at Jacksonville State University.


April 4, 2012

Fingertip Pressure & Grip Size






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, explains the the importance of controlling fingertip pressure and the effects of grip size.

March 22, 2011

Arm and Racket Extension






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu, HI shows the difference between arm and racket extension at contact.

November 8, 2010

Back Leg/Hip Rotation






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Mark Beede, USPTA, Director, Hawaii Pacific Tennis Foundation, shows a tip on how to get more angular momentum on the modern day forehand.


August 2, 2010

Double Bend or Straight Arm?







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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, explains the differences between the bent and straight arm forehand technique.

January 11, 2010

Whole or Part Method






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School explains the "Whole" and "Part" method of teaching. According to Dr. Paul Salitsky, the newer research suggests that we should be using the "Whole" method as opposed to the "Part" method. Paul is a lecturer in Sports & Exercise Psychology, Motor Learning, Neurobiology, Physiology & Behavior and Exercise Biology at US Davis.

In this video, we break down the forehand groundstroke. One commonality of all the world-class players today is that the majority of them use the "Whole" method of a circular loop backswing on both the forehand and backhand sides.

This elliptical swing pattern allows the racket head speed to increase throughout the swing. Because players today position themselves a little farther back behind the baseline than in previous years, the shorter backswings do not generate enough velocity to keep the ball deep into the court.


October 30, 2009

Palm Down







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Paul Roetert is the Managing Director of the United States Tennis Association's Player Development Program. In addition, he serves as Tournament Director of the U.S. Open Junior Tennis Championships. Before re-joining the USTA in November, 2001, Paul spent two years as the Executive Director of the American Sport Education Program. Prior to that position he spent eleven years as the Administrator of Sport Science for the USTA where he developed the sport science program. He also served as Vice Chairman of the sport science committee.

Paul has published extensively in the field of tennis, including two books, 16 book chapters and over 100 articles. He is a Fellow in the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), a member of the United States Professional Tennis Association (USPTA) and the Professional Registry (PTR). In 1998 he received the PTR's Plagenhoef Award for sport science; in 1999 the Editorial Excellence Award from the National Strength and Conditioning Association for his work on the Journal of Strength and Conditioning and Research; in 2000 the Outstanding Alumni award from the University of Connecticut. He is also the 2002 Educational Merit Award recipient from the International Tennis Hall of Fame for outstanding service to the game of tennis.

Paul holds a Ph.D. in biomechanics from the University of Connecticut. Originally from the Netherlands, he and his wife Barbara reside in Miami, Florida.


September 28, 2009

Reverse Forehand Comparison







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Mark Kovacs explains the difference between the reverse forehand and the forehand that Nadal uses.

DR. MARK KOVACS, PhD., CSCS
Senior Manager of Strength & Conditioning/Sports Science
USTA Training Center in Boca Raton, FL

Dr. Kovacs was an accomplished player and coach before transitioning to a career as a sport science expert. As a player he was a collegiate All-American and NCAA champion at Auburn University. He has a Masters degree in Exercise Science from Auburn and a Ph.D. in Exercise Physiology from The University of Alabama. Dr. Kovacs is an Associate Editor of the Strength and Conditioning Journal and co-author of tennis book titled "Tennis Training-Enhancing On-Court Performance". Mark is a certified strength and conditioning specialist through the NSCA, certified Health/Fitness Instructor through the American College of Sports Medicine, USPTA certified coach and United States Track and Field Level II Sprints Coach. Before starting with the USTA, Mark was an Assistant Professor of Exercise Science and Wellness at Jacksonville State University.


September 8, 2009

Slap Shot Forehand







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Jeff Fitch, University of Hawaii, demonstrates the "Slap Shot" forehand.

July 2, 2009

Western Grip (Part 2)






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Bernard Gusman, USPTA, Tennis Director, Punahou School, USTA High Performance Coach, Honolulu, Hawaii explains the Western forehand grip. (Part 2)

June 30, 2009

Semi-Western Grip (Part 2)







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Bernard Gusman, USPTA, Tennis Director, Punahou School, USTA High Performance Coach, Honolulu, Hawaii explains the Semi-Western forehand grip. (Part 2)

June 27, 2009

Semi-Western Grip (Part 1)






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Bernard Gusman, USPTA, Tennis Director, Punahou School, USTA High Performance Coach, Honolulu, Hawaii shows the advantages and disadvantages of using the Semi-Western forehand grip. (Part 1)

June 26, 2009

Eastern Forehand Grip







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Bernard Gusman, USPTA, Tennis Director, Punahou School, USTA High Performance Coach, Honolulu, Hawaii shows the advantages and disadvantages of using the Eastern forehand grip.

June 21, 2009

Continental Grip, (Part 2)







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Bernard Gusman, USPTA, Tennis Director, Punahou School, USTA High Performance Coach, Honolulu, Hawaii shows the advantages and disadvantages of using the Continental grip. (Part 2)

June 20, 2009

Continental Grip, (Part 1)







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Bernard Gusman, USPTA, Tennis Director, Punahou School, USTA High Performance Coach, Honolulu, Hawaii shows the advantages and disadvantages of using the Continental grip.

May 26, 2009

Eastern or Semi-Western?






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In this video, Dr. Porter shows a comparison of the eastern and semi-western grip.

Dr. Porter does more than just coach. As a full professor in the Exercise and Sports Science Division he teaches many of the core courses required by Exercise and Sports Science majors. He is the faculty liaison overseeing the University's Fitness Center and is responsible for the Faculty Fitness Program and the "personal fitness trainers" assigned to selected faculty and staff members. He also volunteers his time to teach religion classes on campus.

Dr. Porter, a USPTA Master Professional is also active in tennis on the national and international level. He was a past President of the United States Professional Tennis Association, a 14,000-member organization of tennis teaching professionals worldwide. Dr. Porter is a much sought-after speaker and has given clinics and workshops for the ATP, the ITF, the USPTA, and the USTA. He has spoken in the former Soviet Union, Mainland China, Malaysia, Singapore, the South Pacific, Mexico, and South America.

Dr. Porter is a member of MENSA. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from BYU in Provo, Utah and his Doctorate from the University of Hawaii. He loves to read, listen to music, and spend time with his family. He is active in church work for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and served as a missionary to New England as a young man. He is married to Lorrie Porter and they have four children, Terah, Lincoln, Dillon and Taylor.


May 18, 2009

Western Grip







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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu, Hawaii shows the advantages and disadvantages of using the western forehand grip.


April 20, 2009

Extend the racket tip






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In this video, Dr. Porter gives a tip on extending the racket head on the follow through.

Dr. Porter does more than just coach. As a full professor in the Exercise and Sports Science Division he teaches many of the core courses required by Exercise and Sports Science majors. He is the faculty liaison overseeing the University's Fitness Center and is responsible for the Faculty Fitness Program and the "personal fitness trainers" assigned to selected faculty and staff members. He also volunteers his time to teach religion classes on campus.

Dr. Porter, a USPTA Master Professional is also active in tennis on the national and international level. He was a past President of the United States Professional Tennis Association, a 14,000-member organization of tennis teaching professionals worldwide. Dr. Porter is a much sought-after speaker and has given clinics and workshops for the ATP, the ITF, the USPTA, and the USTA. He has spoken in the former Soviet Union, Mainland China, Malaysia, Singapore, the South Pacific, Mexico, and South America.

Dr. Porter is a member of MENSA. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from BYU in Provo, Utah and his Doctorate from the University of Hawaii. He loves to read, listen to music, and spend time with his family. He is active in church work for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and served as a missionary to New England as a young man. He is married to Lorrie Porter and they have four children, Terah, Lincoln, Dillon and Taylor.

April 4, 2009

The Reverse Forehand







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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School shows Bjorn Borg using the reverse finish from film footage taken over 30 years ago.

March 2, 2009

Visualize a 180






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu Hawaii shows an elite movement of angular momentum that produces a 180 degree turn in the legs, hips and shoulders. Everyone possesses the ability to use angular momentum, however, your muscular strength and your optimal trunk rotation determines the amount of force you can generate, regardless of what stance you are using. You must emphasize the importance of the legs when attempting this advanced maneuver.

February 7, 2009

High take-back






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional at Punahou School in Honolulu Hawaii shows a clip of the recent 2009 Australian Open. In this clip, ESPN commentator Brad Gilbert talks about the "High Takeback" in today╩╗s modern game.

January 27, 2009

Picture the racket path







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In this video, Dr. Porter gives a tip on picturing the racket path on the arc of the back swing and follow through.

Dr. Porter does more than just coach. As a full professor in the Exercise and Sports Science Division he teaches many of the core courses required by Exercise and Sports Science majors. He is the faculty liaison overseeing the University's Fitness Center and is responsible for the Faculty Fitness Program and the "personal fitness trainers" assigned to selected faculty and staff members. He also volunteers his time to teach religion classes on campus.

Dr. Porter, a USPTA Master Professional is also active in tennis on the national and international level. He was a past President of the United States Professional Tennis Association, a 12,000-member organization of tennis teaching professionals worldwide. Dr. Porter is a much sought-after speaker and has given clinics and workshops for the ATP, the ITF, the USPTA, and the USTA. He has spoken in the former Soviet Union, Mainland China, Malaysia, Singapore, the South Pacific, Mexico, and South America.

Dr. Porter is a member of MENSA. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from BYU in Provo, Utah and his Doctorate from the University of Hawaii. He loves to read, listen to music, and spend time with his family. He is active in church work for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and served as a missionary to New England as a young man. He is married to Lorrie Porter and they have four children, Terah, Lincoln, Dillon and Taylor.

January 12, 2009

Backswing tip






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Dr. Porter does more than just coach. As a full professor in the Exercise and Sports Science Division he teaches many of the core courses required by Exercise and Sports Science majors. He is the faculty liaison overseeing the University's Fitness Center and is responsible for the Faculty Fitness Program and the "personal fitness trainers" assigned to selected faculty and staff members. He also volunteers his time to teach religion classes on campus.

Dr. Porter, a USPTA Master Professional is also active in tennis on the national and international level. He was a past President of the United States Professional Tennis Association, a 12,000-member organization of tennis teaching professionals worldwide. Dr. Porter is a much sought-after speaker and has given clinics and workshops for the ATP, the ITF, the USPTA, and the USTA. He has spoken in the former Soviet Union, Mainland China, Malaysia, Singapore, the South Pacific, Mexico, and South America.

Dr. Porter is a member of MENSA. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from BYU in Provo, Utah and his Doctorate from the University of Hawaii. He loves to read, listen to music, and spend time with his family. He is active in church work for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and served as a missionary to New England as a young man. He is married to Lorrie Porter and they have four children, Terah, Lincoln, Dillon and Taylor.

January 6, 2009

High elbow finish






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This footage is from the 2008 USPTA World Conference in La Quinta, California. Here Nick explains the importance of the "High Elbow" finish on the forehand and backhand groundstroke.

Nick Bollettieri (www.nickbollettieri.com) is one of the most influential people in the world of tennis and a legend who has transcended the sport. In 1978, he founded the Nick Bollettieri Tennis Academy (NBTA) in Florida. The NBTA was the first full-time tennis boarding school to combine intense training on the court with a custom-designed academic curriculum. What was once a program of primarily on-court training has evolved into a multi-faceted approach which includes blending the technical and strategic on-court training with specialized performance physical training and mental conditioning. The Bollettieri approach not only builds athletes on the court, but more importantly, prepares them for a successful life off the court as well.


At 77 years old, Nick is still going strong, rising at 4:20 am every morning to get to the gym by 5:00 am. He starts coaching at 5:30 am, stopping only for a quick lunch before finishing his last lesson at 7:00 p.m. Nick teaches private lessons, as well as oversees the progress of numerous professional players, the Elite Juniors, and the general Academy groups. He also travels around the country and internationally on an annual basis conducting clinics, making appearances, and giving motivation speeches for all audiences.

December 23, 2008

"git a grip"






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu, Hawaii shows some tips on choosing the right grip.

Researchers apparently have "gotten a grip" on the relationship between the development of tennis elbow (tendonitis) and the size of the grip on the racket a player uses.

A grip that is either too big or too small for the player's hand is not a factor in whether or not a player may develop tennis elbow, according to a study published in the December issue of The American Journal of Sports Medicine. "An optimal grip size may influence the force with which a player hits the ball, but variations in grip size are unlikely to be contributing factors in overuse injuries such as tennis elbow," concludes George F. Hatch III, MD, currently of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, and colleagues. (Dr. Hatch conducted the study while in training at the Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic in Los Angeles.)

"Clinicians who treat patients with tennis elbow often tell them to try a different size grip in order to alleviate muscle fatigue," says Dr. Hatch. "Our study demonstrates that those recommendations have no scientific basis. Therefore, it is reasonable to recommend whatever grip size feels most comfortable for them."

Tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) is the most common upper extremity complaint among recreational players, accounting for 75% to 85% of elbow injuries. Researchers believe it results from repetitive impacts between the ball and racket coupled with poor wrist stability especially during the backhand swing. The backhand stroke seems to be the culprit because it results in overexertion and micro-tearing within two primary muscles inside the forearm.

Hatch and coauthors at Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic studied 16 NCAA Division I and II tennis players (10 men, 6 women) with no prior history of elbow problems. Twelve players were right-handed; four left-handed. All players were proficient at using a one-handed backhand. Players' "recommended" grip size was determined using an industry standard: measuring the distance from the bottom lengthwise crease in the palm to the tip of the ring finger with a ruler.

The researchers inserted electrodes into five different muscles in each player's dominant arm to measure the firing pattern of their muscles (electromyogram, EMG). After a warm-up period, players then performed three single-handed backhand strokes using identical model rackets with three different grip sizes: the "recommended" grip size, a "small" grip size (1/4 inch smaller than recommended), and a "large" grip size (1/4 inch larger than recommended). One-quarter inch size variations were chosen because most commercially available adult-sized rackets have grip sizes ranging from 4 inches to 4 5/8 inches. A ball machine set at a constant speed and angle provided consistent ball delivery. Each player's strokes were captured on high speed video which was then synchronized with the corresponding EMG.

Of the five forearm muscles studied, none showed significant variations in firing patterns during three phases of the backhand stroke: accelerated forward motion of the racket, ball impact, and early follow-through. Close attention was paid to two specific muscles, the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) and the extensor digitorium communis (EDC), which are located beside each other in the forearm and originate from the bony prominence on the outside of the elbow. Overuse, microtrauma, and failed healing in both of these muscles can result in tendonitis. Yet larger and smaller grip sizes did not affect the activity of these two muscles, the authors found.

"Based on our data, we recommend recreational tennis players use the currently accepted grip size measurement technique as a starting point in when picking a grip size," says Dr. Hatch. "However, the player should feel free to increase or decrease the size of the grip based upon what feels most comfortable. Previous studies have shown that improper form is one of the biggest risk factors for the development of tendonitis."

The American Journal of Sports Medicine is the monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM). AOSSM is a world leader in sports medicine education, research, communication, and fellowship. The Society works closely with many sports medicine specialists and clinicians to improve the identification, prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of sports injuries. Please visit http://www.sportsmed.org.

American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine


November 16, 2008

Weight transfer







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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School shows clips of ATP players landing with the correct weight transfer. It is important that when players land they are in position to move immediately to the next shot. Included in the video is an excerpt of Dave Porter, Ed.D. from a recent high performance workshop conducted at Punahou School. In this clip he explains this complex movement.

October 23, 2008

Handling High Balls







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2008 USPTA Hawaii Convention Nano Presentations. Cathy Nicoloff, USPTA, shows a tip on how to handle high balls on the forehand and backhand groundstroke.

Cathy Nicoloff:

TRAINING/TEACHING HISTORY: Have taught tennis for 35 years. A USPTA Professional 1 since 1986. I have taught tennis summers at a local country club while I was still in high school and college. Was a PBI Professional from 1982-1984(Oahu, Maui,Texas,Puerto Rico,Virgin Islands.) Oahu/The Ilikai Beach Club. Maui/The Royal Lahaina & Napili Kai Beach Club. Puerto Rico/ Cerromar Beach Club. The Virgin Islands/Caneel Bay St. John. After PBI, I was the Dir. of Tennis at The Maui Surf. Then became the Pro at The Maui Marriott in 1986. I took position at The Wailea Tennis Club in 1986 as a professional then Head Teaching Professional and now Director of Tennis. I keep updated in the latest teaching techniques through being a member of the USPTA and attending their Divisional and National Conventions yearly. Also attend Coaches workshops yearly. Have taken several courses on Junior Competitive Training and Footwork.

September 8, 2008

Kuznetsova╩╗s "Lasso"






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School highlights Svetlana Kuznetsova from this years 2008 US Open. In these clips we see the many follow throughs of Svetlana, including the "Lasso" finish. Video footage shot in HD.

June 4, 2008

Focus Pads







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John Nelson, USPTA, Head Mens Tennis Coach for the University of Hawaii uses "Focus Pads" to teach the power source for hitting ground strokes.

May 28, 2008

YouTube Lesson






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu, Hawaii gives Luis, from Venezuela a lesson on the forehand. Luis uploaded a video of his forehand on You Tube and sent me the link. Luis has a strong forehand and only needs to add a couple of things to make his forehand a major weapon. At the 2.5 - 3.5 level, it is important to develop topspin as most players at that level have difficulty handling balls above the shoulder. That is precisely why I teach the loop backswing to to 3.5 players and below. The object of the game is to make your opponents play short through using spin, depth and pace. Currently, Luis is primarily using pace with the end result being too many balls landing in the net.

Luis will have to add an open/semi-open stance and experiment with a semi-western grip. The height of the follow through is important. The harder and flatter you hit the ball the lower the follow through. The higher the net clearance, the higher the follow through. Presently, too many balls are landing in the net.

Concentrating on developing a loop backswing will add consistency and spin to his game and will cut down on errors. The loop backswing is the "Perfect Storm." However, one must develop the timing and rhythm necessary to create this powerful and effective stroke. Currently, there are too many errors and not enough long rallies in the baseline-to-baseline rallies. It is important to never warm up down the center of the court for more than five minutes. Immediately after the warm up, one should step outside to the alleys to begin crosscourt rallies. This will develop better angles, depth and pace.

In this video, I have concentrated on two areas I would like Luis to work on: footwork and a grip change.


May 10, 2008

Age Limit Myth!






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, teaches the windshield wiper forehand to a student 75 years old. There is no age limit to learning the windshield wiper forehand. John is the perfect example of how easy it is to learn this motion, even at the age of 75!

April 12, 2008

Wrist-watch follow through






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Will Hamilton, USPTR, Coach and Co-Founder of Fuzzy Yellow Balls shows a tip on the follow through for the forehand groundstroke. In this video, he shows how you should "Check the Time" on your watch at the end of the follow through.
Will started playing tennis at the age of 5. He was a member of the Davidson College tennis team (Division One) and, after graduation, coached at the Tennis Center at College Park outside Washington, DC. For more information visit Fuzzyyellowballs.com.

April 10, 2008

Pre-stretch forehand






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu, Hawaii shows an aerial view of the pre-stretch forehand. Pre-stretching the wrist on forehand has an enormous effect on the impact of the ball. The faster your racket head is going at the contact point, the greater the amount of kinetic energy that will be transformed from the racket head to the ball. A typical way some people try to hit the ball harder is to snap their wrist at the contact point, however, this action actually slows down the racket head speed and actually ends up injuring the player. Professional tennis players can generally achieve racket head speeds in excess of 50 mph using the pre-stretch. It is important that the pre-stretch begins at the backswing phase and not at the end phase of the stroke.

March 28, 2008

Wiper take-back






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu, Hawaii shows a quick tip on the forehand groundstroke. By inverting the racket face on the take back it is easier to create the windshield wiper forehand.

March 23, 2008

"C" Swing






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu, Hawaii explains the "C" swing.


February 20, 2008

Myth: "Racket Back"







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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu, Hawaii explains the myth of taking the "Racket Back." You should really think "Racket Up" and concentrate on a setting up with a balanced unit turn. By imagining your racket is a stop sign and immediately placing the stop sign up and out you can develop the proper take back. By delaying the take back you will develop a more smooth loop backswing. Many players take the racket back too early and this develops into muscling the ball at contact.

February 5, 2008

Role of the opposite arm







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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, explains the use of the opposite arm on the take back of the forehand and backhand groundstroke. All great players use the opposite arm to initiate the "Unit Turn" on the groundstrokes.

January 5, 2008

Push vs Pull Forehand






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School shows a comparison of the Push vs Pull stroke.


December 22, 2007

Loop vs Straight Take Back







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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School explains the timing on the loop backswing. It takes time for this type of backswing to do its magic. This video is of the 7th and 8th grade Intermediate Girls tennis team at Punahou School. Coordinating the timing of the outside leg and the backswing are key. On the follow through the shoulders should end up in a linear position and not facing the net. Examples of a straight take back backswing are also shown. Straight take backs can be used for fast balls or taking the ball early, however if the student has time there is no reason why the loop backswing cannot be learned.

November 21, 2007

Horizontal Finish






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Stan Oley is the National Sales Manager for Playmate Ball Machines in Raleigh, N.C. Stan is a member of the USPTA, USTA and HEAD/Penn and Lotto Advisory Staffs. During his 18 years as a teaching professional, he was the head pro at the International Tennis Center in Key Biscayne, Fla., and also the director of tennis at Orange Lake Country Club in Orlando, Fla. With 15 years of ball machine experience, Stan has presented seminars at conventions; had drills published in Tennis Week and ADDvantage; and featured on "On Court with USPTA TM."


November 12, 2007

Rotate then hit







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Dave Porter, EdD - Head Mens and Womens Coach - BYU explains the swing path of hitting the open stance windshield wiper forehand. The video splits screens video footage of David Nalbandian's forehand from the 2007 US Open.

October 21, 2007

Swivel Disks







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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Wilson TEAM Member, Yip Team Member gives a lesson on angular momentum to the 7th grade girls PE class at Punahou School. Students are placed on disks made out of lazy susan's. Lazy susan's can be bought at your local hardware store.

May 25, 2007

Butt Cap Down






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Lee Couillard, USPTA - Wilson TEAM Member, YIP Team member shows examples of pros pointing the butt of the racket handle down on the loop back swing. The motion of the backswing and followthrough should look like the letter "C".

May 3, 2007

Fire the Hips






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John Nelson, University of Hawaii Men's Tennis Coach explains the importance of "Firing the Hips" on the groundstrokes.

March 27, 2007

Keeping the head "Quiet"







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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Wilson TEAM Member, "YIP" Team Member explains a term known as "Keeping the head QUIET"

March 18, 2007

Jeu de Paume







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Jerry Cape, USPTA, Tecnifibre TEAM Member, shows a tip on the forehand.
"Jeu de Paume" a game using the palm of the hand.


March 17, 2007

Spread the fingers






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Wilson TEAM Member, "YIP" Team Member shows a tip on the forehand to "spread the fingers" to get a better grip.


January 7, 2007

Think Inside Out

Lee Couillard, USPTA , Wilson TEAM Member, ""YIP' Team Member demonstrates thinking "inside out" for teaching the forehand.

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November 29, 2006

3 Modern Forehands

Lee Couillard, USPTA, Wilson TEAM Member shows 3 examples of the Modern Forehand. First, the 5.0 player, 2nd the College level player and last, the Pro level player.

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November 18, 2006

Open not Angular

Lee Couillard, USPTA, Wilson TEAM Member, "YIP" Team Member shows a comparison of the open stance forehand and the modern forehand using angular momentum. I have a difficult time demonstrating angular momentum due to flexibility, lack of knee bend(loading) and the grip I am using.


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November 9, 2006

Split Turn

Kyle Kaneshiro, K2TENS, USPTA, Head Team member. Kyle explains a technique called "Split Turn"


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November 5, 2006

Positioning

David T. Porter Ed.D., USPTA Master Professional, HEAD Advisory Staff Member and Head Men's and Women's Tennis Coach for BYU-Hawaii talks about position on the court for the run-around forehand.

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October 27, 2006

Figure 8 Forehand

Lee Couillard, USPTA, Wilson TEAM Member, Balle de Match Yip Team uses a ribbon attached to a tennis racket to demonstrate rhythm.

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July 21, 2006

108 mph Forehand

Lee Couillard, USPTA, Wilson TEAM Member, examines Fernando Gonzalez's forehand. Fernando has one of the biggest forehand's in the game. Fernando loads and explodes on every forehand he hits which makes his forehand a threat in today's modern game.

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June 24, 2006

Wiper Followthrough

Johnny Rozesstta, Former Jamaican Davis Cup and ATP player gives a tip on the forehand followthrough.

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June 10, 2006

Russian Followthrough

Michiyo Kato, USPTA is splitscreened with the 2006 semi-finalist at the French Open, 17 year old Nicole Vaidisova. Comparisons are made on their followthrough.

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May 22, 2006

Modern Forehand

Modern Forehand comparisons on the follow through. Windshield wiper finish compared to the "elbow up" across the neck finish. Lee Couillard, Wilson TEAM Member, USPTA Honolulu, HI

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May 17, 2006

Forehand Finish

Lee Couillard, Wilson TEAM Member, USPTA - Punahou School, Honolulu, HI shows one type of followthrough on the forehand groundstroke. Students are split-screened with professionals practicing at the US Open.

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May 5, 2006

Followthrough tip

Michael Harper, USPTR Philadelphia, PA gives a tip on the contact point and follow through on the forehand ground stroke.

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Preparation Phase

Johnny Rozesstta, Former Jamaican Davis Cup & ATP player gives a tip on the preparation phase of the forehand and backhand ground stroke.


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Correct stance

Johnny Rozesstta, Former Jamaican Davis Cup & ATP player gives a tip on the Forehand.


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April 12, 2006

"Use of the Opposite Hand"

Bernard Gusman, USPTA, Tennis Tip on one of the foundations of tennis, "Use of the Opposite Hand"

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April 6, 2006

Modern Forehand Tip, David Izumi, USPTA

Large ball warm up for Modern Forehand stroke by David Izumi, Honolulu, Hawaii

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