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April 1, 2015

14 year old Felix Aliassime

Quebec's Félix Auger-Aliassime, just 14, makes noise against the experienced pros at Drummondville Challenger Click here to read about Felix Aliassime.

July 7, 2014

Tennis Tactics App






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Testing out a new Tennis Tactics App

October 9, 2013

College Scholarships - Football vs Tennis






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Each year more than $1 billion is awarded to over 126,000 student-athletes across the country.

Chances of a high school athlete competing in College Tennis * Men Women
Number of High School Tennis Players 195,966 218,093
Number of College Tennis Players 10,122 10,737
% of high school players competing in college 5.2% 4.9%

** NCAA I women's tennis is a headcount sport, so there is a limit of 8 players that can be under scholarship annually. All other NCAA tennis programs are equivalency sports for scholarship purposes, so partial scholarships can be awarded to meet the NCAA limit per school. For example, an NCAA Division I school can award 9 male tennis players each a 1/2 equivalent scholarship and still meet the limit of 4.5 per school. All NAIA sports are equivalency sports for scholarship limits whereas all NJCAA sports are head-count sports for scholarship limits. NJCAA II tennis is not an official sport sponsored by the NJCAA, so NJCAA I full scholarship awards are limited to 3 per team in order to allow traditional NJCAA II programs the opportunity to more effectively compete.

*** NCAA & NJCAA Division III schools do not award athletic scholarships, but provide other financial assistance that student athletes may qualify for. These numbers are maximums - schools can elect to fully fund athletic scholarships to the limit, award none, or fund somewhere in between. Additionally, these are annual limits for the entire school team; so for a 4 year school only about 25% of the limit per school will typically be available for incoming students. See our page on scholarship limits for more information.


There are 115 colleges with NCAA Division I football programs, give or take half a dozen in any given year. These colleges can offer up to 85 scholarships per year, but every team has some non-scholarship players, so let's estimate that there are an average of 110 players on a Division I team. A quick check of the rosters shows that each team has between 10 and 20 seniors. So let's say that each team has an average of 15 seniors. That makes for a total of 12,650 players, with 1,725 seniors. But that doesn't count Division II, which has roughly the same number of teams, so double those numbers to 25,300 players and 3,450 seniors. So the first lesson that our foray into math offers is that not every college football player makes it to his senior year, and being offered a scholarship out of high school is no guarantee of eventually entering the NFL draft.

So, including the 50 or so underclassmen who leave college and declare themselves eligible for the NFL draft, that's a pool of 3,500 players who could be drafted. Now consider the number of players that were drafted by NFL teams in 2011: 254. In other words, only approximately 7% of eligible players get drafted. Those players then have to compete with everyone else on the roster, plus any undrafted college free agents (that is, players who weren't drafted but are still offered the chance to try to make the roster), plus any other veterans or players from other leagues the team might want to check out, just to make it onto the Week 1 roster.

To make a long story short (too late), the odds of going from high school football to college football to the NFL are not good.

There are more than 1,000 Division I and Division II universities that offer almost 3,400 tennis scholarships across the country. What's even more amazing is that some of these scholarships go unused every year. I will occasionally get a phone call from a random college coach asking me if I know of a good kid looking to play college tennis because they have a vacant scholarship available.

May 9, 2013

Robotic Assisted Tennis Sleeve






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The Robotic Assisted Tennis Sleeve is a feasible, safe, and efficient non-surgical treatment for those who have difficulty learning advanced techniques of the swing-paths, joint-angles, backswings, and finishes of professional players.

Robotic Assisted Tennis Sleeve Specifications:

Systems Integrators - System integrators are used to establish the requirements of a motion in the swing-paths of the classic, straight, or bent-arm forehands.

Robotic Rotary Joint - Consisting of a stationary part connected to the arm of the robot and a rotating part connected to the wrist and sleeve allowing for electrical and pneumatic cables to stay in place while cables required for the sleeve are free to rotate.

Internal Sensor - An apparatus within the manipulator arm that sends information on motion to a control unit.

Presence-Sensing Safeguarding Device - A mechanism used to sense and detect when an object enters a given area that could potential hurt the player.

Rotational Motion - Describes circular movement with respect to the axis.

Systems Compensator - A remote device that involves multiple shear pads to help with spin, swing-path and speed operations. Refers to position-level and velocity-level.

Acceleration-Level - The measure of variation of joint speeds over time. Double and single differentiation of this level gives the overall change in position and change in position overtime, respectively.

Resolved-rate - Determining the joint's overall changed in velocity over time based on restrictions of the end-effector's motion.

Velocity-level - The measure of variation of joint position over time. Yields the overall change in position. Single differentiation yields the change in joint speed over time.

Manual Programming - The user physically sets specific tasks and limits on the robot.

Biomimetic - Imitation of biological systems occurring in nature

Inverse Kinematics - Determination of a joint's overall change in position based on restrictions on the end-effector's motion of a robot.

Awareness Signal - A sound or light that alerts one if joint angles are too extreme.

Interface - The separation between robots and the equipment not nearby. The sensors that are required for communication between the devices use signals relaying input and output data.

Energy Source - Energy is provided by conversion of various types of sources such spin, backswing and follow-through.

Equality constraint - The end-effector's change of position, movement and location must be equal to counter-movement of the opposite arm action.

Fixed Automation - Automated, electronically controlled system for classic, straight, bent or circular motions. These systems are mainly used for students who have little flexibility.

Flexibility - The diverse jobs that a robot is capable of executing.

Fully Constrained Sleeve - The number of equality constraints on the robot are equal to the number of independent joints.

March 24, 2013

Lower Body Power







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DR. MARK KOVACS, PhD., CSCS
Senior Manager of Strength & Conditioning/Sports Science
USTA Training Center in Boca Raton, FL

Dr. Kovacs was an accomplished player and coach before transitioning to a career as a sport science expert. As a player he was a collegiate All-American and NCAA champion at Auburn University. He has a Masters degree in Exercise Science from Auburn and a Ph.D. in Exercise Physiology from The University of Alabama. Dr. Kovacs is an Associate Editor of the Strength and Conditioning Journal and co-author of tennis book titled "Tennis Training-Enhancing On-Court Performance". Mark is a certified strength and conditioning specialist through the NSCA, certified Health/Fitness Instructor through the American College of Sports Medicine, USPTA certified coach and United States Track and Field Level II Sprints Coach. Before starting with the USTA, Mark was an Assistant Professor of Exercise Science and Wellness at Jacksonville State University.

February 12, 2013

Train in Spain?







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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School. Justin Gimelstob talks about the current state of American Tennis. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to teaching the game of tennis.

February 5, 2013

Division I Scholarship






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School interviews Punahou senior Scout Shutter.

Tennis Recruiting Network article, Click here to read more about Scout's incredible journey.


February 4, 2013

iPads or a Camcorder?







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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School. After meeting with the Punahou IT Department and discussing future technology, our tennis school decided to order iPads instead of a video camera to film private and group lessons.
There are many new apps being developed that can do slow motion and frame-by-frame analysis.

January 10, 2013

A Beat Down






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School explains how PHYSICAL PREPARATION is one of the three keys to athletic success.

December 30, 2012

Modern or Current Tennis?







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In this video, Dr. Porter about todays game. Is it "modern" or "current tennis"?

Dr. Porter does more than just coach. As a full professor in the Exercise and Sports Science Division he teaches many of the core courses required by Exercise and Sports Science majors. He is the faculty liaison overseeing the University's Fitness Center and is responsible for the Faculty Fitness Program and the "personal fitness trainers" assigned to selected faculty and staff members. He also volunteers his time to teach religion classes on campus.

Dr. Porter, a USPTA Master Professional is also active in tennis on the national and international level. He was a past President of the United States Professional Tennis Association, a 14,000-member organization of tennis teaching professionals worldwide. Dr. Porter is a much sought-after speaker and has given clinics and workshops for the ATP, the ITF, the USPTA, and the USTA. He has spoken in the former Soviet Union, Mainland China, Malaysia, Singapore, the South Pacific, Mexico, and South America.

Dr. Porter is a member of MENSA. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from BYU in Provo, Utah and his Doctorate from the University of Hawaii. He loves to read, listen to music, and spend time with his family. He is active in church work for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and served as a missionary to New England as a young man. He is married to Lorrie Porter and they have four children, Terah, Lincoln, Dillon and Taylor.

November 19, 2012

Daily Stretch






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Jerry Hubbard, USPTA Tennis Professional, demonstrates daily stretching exercises.

September 24, 2012

PE & Medical Excuses

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Paul Zientarski, PE (LRPE) Coordinator, PE4Life Consultant.

July 2, 2012

"Miracle-Grow" for the brain






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Paul Zientarski, PE (LRPE) Coordinator, PE4Life Consultant.

June 30, 2012

P.E. & Academics







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Paul Zientarski, PE (LRPE) Coordinator, PE4Life Consultant.

May 15, 2012

Footwork - Drive Phase







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DR. MARK KOVACS, PhD., CSCS
Senior Manager of Strength & Conditioning/Sports Science
USTA Training Center in Boca Raton, FL

Dr. Kovacs was an accomplished player and coach before transitioning to a career as a sport science expert. As a player he was a collegiate All-American and NCAA champion at Auburn University. He has a Masters degree in Exercise Science from Auburn and a Ph.D. in Exercise Physiology from The University of Alabama. Dr. Kovacs is an Associate Editor of the Strength and Conditioning Journal and co-author of tennis book titled "Tennis Training-Enhancing On-Court Performance". Mark is a certified strength and conditioning specialist through the NSCA, certified Health/Fitness Instructor through the American College of Sports Medicine, USPTA certified coach and United States Track and Field Level II Sprints Coach. Before starting with the USTA, Mark was an Assistant Professor of Exercise Science and Wellness at Jacksonville State University.

April 29, 2012

The New Modern Forehand?







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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School shows a comparison of the new modern forehand to the old modern forehand of the 90's.

April 16, 2012

"Farm" hands






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School.

March 9, 2012

Grip Pressure vs Grip Strength






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, explains the differences between grip pressure and grip strength.

July 7, 2011

Novak Djokovic's Flexibility Exercises







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Novak Djokovic demonstrates basic stretching and flexibility exercises everyone should do.

June 9, 2011

NBA vs ATP Scoring







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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu, HI expands upon the difference in the scoring system in tennis vs other sports.

The scoring system in tennis is much more challenging than in any other sport because of the emphasis on the importance of certain points at certain times in each game and set. Also, the value of certain points are greater if they are converted as in case of break points won. Note that it is not the number of break points that matters, however, it is the number of break points in different games that counts, especially if they have NOT been converted. This can be emotionally devastating.

Even though there is no time clock and points are not accumulating like in a basketball or football game, there are very few instances where the player that won had less points than the runner-up, so it is possible to lose more points that your opponent and still win the match. So, it is important to not fall too far behind on the total count. To make basketball similar to tennis, and to make it more exciting, they could give bonus points for leading after each quarter. Now the pressure would be on and you would see a quicker pace at the end of each quarter and a higher degree of intensity.

In this video, Federer came within 2 points of equaling the total amount of points won, however, he could not find enough energy to come back and tie the score and then move ahead in total points won. He trailed in total points won since the start of the second set.

May 4, 2011

Music and Rhythm - Part 2







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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu, HI talks about the Music and Rhythm - Part 2.


April 25, 2011

Music and Rhythm - Part 1







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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu, HI talks about music and rhythm.

April 14, 2011

Art of Rhythm







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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu, HI talks about the "Art of Rhythm."

April 7, 2011

Rhythm and Footwork Patterns







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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu, HI talks about rhythm and footwork patterns in tennis and dance.

April 1, 2011

Rhythm and Tempo






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu, HI talks about the interdependence of rhythm and tempo.

March 26, 2011

What is Rhythm?






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu, HI talks about rhythm.

August 20, 2010

Squats do's & don'ts







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Troy Hotz, Punahou Strength and Conditioning Coach, Punahou School, explains some do's and don'ts when attempting squats.

Keith Wassung writes: The barbell front squat is a phenomenal, yet seldom performed version of the regular barbell squat. This exercise directs a great deal of focus onto the front part of the thigh, especially the vastus medalis, which is the part of the lower thigh above the knee that looks like a teardrop, the rectus femoris, or center thigh, and the hamstrings. There is also an effect on the hips, lower back and to some extent, the abdominal wall. The front squat is not a replacement for the back squat, but if done effectively, can be a tremendous boost to overall lower body strength, development and flexibility. Here's the rest of his excellent write-up.

Front squats are tricky to get used to-but its important that you develop the technical skills needed to become comfortable with this movement. In the majority of cases, people feel awkward when first attempting this exercise, which often results in them failing to include it in their routine.

August 12, 2010

The Jerk







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Troy Hotz, Punahou Strength and Conditioning Coach demonstrates the Clean and Jerk.

HUGE STRENGTH GAINS POSSIBLE, BY MIKE CONLEY

Olympic weight lifting is likely the best kept secret when it comes to fitness. Walk into any gym these days and you will be hard pressed to find anyone doing a clean or a snatch. I have read several books on the topic and even purchased a "how to video" on performing the lifts correctly. Now I do not have any dreams of being a professional Olympic weightlifter but I do understand its value in developing my fitness level. Nothing compares to Olympic lifts in terms of speed development, flexibility, total body strength and muscle gains.

Actually, there are really only two Olympic lifts, the snatch and the clean and jerk. A snatch is a combination of a dead lift, barbell shrug, and an over head squat performed in one fluid movement. The clean and jerk is a combination of a dead lift, upright row, front squat and a push press.

How effective are Olympic lifts; the vertical leap is a very basic measure of athletic ability - Olympic weightlifters surpass everyone. Michael Stone, PhD and currently professor of exercise science at Eastern State University talks about a test he performed when working at the Olympic Training Center. "We measured vertical jumps of athletes in nearly every sport and Olympic weightlifters had higher average jumps than all other groups - basketball players, gymnast, sprinters, everybody". Even the bulkiest lifters are capable of incredible lifts.

So what is it about these lifts that have mystical effects on the body? They engage nearly all of your muscles to move the weight faster and farther than traditional bodybuilding movements. Actually, each repetition only takes a couple of seconds from start to finish targeting fast twitch muscle fibers. Fast twitch muscles offer the greatest potential for size and strength gains. These are also the muscles that are most often overlooked in the typical weight lifting routine.
If Olympic weightlifting is so superior, why is it you seldom see anyone performing these lifts in the local gyms? The primary reason is they are technically difficult to perform. A bicep curl or a triceps press are relatively easy movements and require very little instruction. A snatch or clean and jerk require a qualified instructor to teach the movements, otherwise, you risk injury or at the very least, incorrect execution.
Luckily there is a shortcut to experience the benefits of Olympic weightlifting. With these lifts there are two phases: the pull and the catch. During the pull you explode upward pulling the barbell off the floor and in front of your thighs as if you were trying to jump to the ceiling. During the catch phase you quickly move your body under the bar and catch the weight on your shoulders or above your head.
lwyn Cosgrove, C.S.C.S, a certified weightlifting coach says "In my experience, 95 percent of the benefits of Olympic lifts come from the pull phase", which is the simplest and safest movement. "Almost all of the technical difficulties occur during the catch phase". That is why he has eliminated the catch phase from nearly all of his training programs and probably a pretty good reason why you should too. He went on to say "Most men need to worry about the catch only if they are interested in competing in the sport".
There are many resources to learn Olympic weight lifting, I would suggest you learn the moves and watch your athletic performance take off.

Mike Conley is an accomplished Webmaster and publisher of www.healthy-diet-weightloss-and-exercise.com [http://www.healthy-diet-weightloss-and-exercise.com] where he provides information on healthy eating,weightloss and exercise [http://www.healthy-diet-weightloss-and-exercise.com/eating_healthy_and_exercising_equal_weight_loss.php]. We encourage you to crab a cup of coffee or your favorite beverage and see what Mike has to say on the subject.

June 1, 2010

Brian Gottfried






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Tennis career

Junior & college

Gottfried was born in Baltimore, Maryland. When he was five years old, some Japanese players stayed with his family while competing in a local tournament. Before leaving, they gave him a tennis racket as a present, thus launching his tennis career. In all, Gottfried won 14 national junior titles. He won the 1962 National 12-and-under singles title, and the doubles title with Jimmy Connors. Gottfried repeated the victory in 1963 with Dick Stockton. In 1964, he won the 12-and-under singles crown.

In 1970, as a freshman at Trinity University in Texas, he won the USTA boys 18s singles championship, as well as the doubles championship with Alexander Mayer. He was an All-American in 1971 and 1972. He was the runner-up in NCAA singles and doubles in 1972.

Professional career

Gottfried turned professional in 1972, and the following year he won his first career singles title in Las Vegas. In 1976, he reached 15 singles finals, winning 5, and was runner-up at the French Open. In April 1977, Newsweek said he was "simply the best male tennis player in the world at the moment."[2] He won the Italian Open doubles championship in four consecutive years (1974-77). He won the men's doubles at the French Open in 1975 and 1977. In 1976, he won the men's doubles title at Wimbledon. He finished his career ranked tied for 22nd in the 50 all-time open era singles titles leaders (16) and tied for 12th among the doubles leaders.

His game was viewed as technically flawless and workman-like, particularly his potent forehand volley, considered one of the best in the game.[3] He honed his game to perfection with dedication and an addiction to practice. The story about his penchant for practice that is most often heard came from Arthur Ashe, who recalled how Gottfried missed a scheduled practice in Miami one afternoon in order to get married, but atoned by putting in a double session the next day.

May 24, 2010

$10,000 point, Low - down the line, High - crosscourt






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Hank Pfister - Bio

Bakersfield-born Hank Pfister was a fixture on the pro tennis circuit with achievements as both a singles and doubles player.

Born in 1953, Pfister was heavily influenced by his tennis coach father. At five years old he was hitting tennis balls and by age seven he had played in his first local tournament.

While attending Bakersfield High School his talent led him to club tournaments in Los Angeles. Pfister later attended Bakersfield College before receiving a full scholarship to San Jose State University, where he was an NCAA Division I First Team All-American in 1976.

In 1977 he began a pro career that included French Open doubles championships in 1978 and 1980, and Association of Tennis Professional singles titles in Maui in 1981 and Rhode Island in 1982.

At his peak, Pfister was rated in the ATP top 10 among doubles players and the top 20 in singles.

Pfister is currently the Director of Tennis and Fitness at Stockdale Country Club in Bakersfield. He has twice been selected as the U.S. Professional Tennis Association California Division Pro of the Year.

May 21, 2010

Watch My Feet, Breaking Slice







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Hank Pfister - Bio

Bakersfield-born Hank Pfister was a fixture on the pro tennis circuit with achievements as both a singles and doubles player.

Born in 1953, Pfister was heavily influenced by his tennis coach father. At five years old he was hitting tennis balls and by age seven he had played in his first local tournament.

While attending Bakersfield High School his talent led him to club tournaments in Los Angeles. Pfister later attended Bakersfield College before receiving a full scholarship to San Jose State University, where he was an NCAA Division I First Team All-American in 1976.

In 1977 he began a pro career that included French Open doubles championships in 1978 and 1980, and Association of Tennis Professional singles titles in Maui in 1981 and Rhode Island in 1982.

At his peak, Pfister was rated in the ATP top 10 among doubles players and the top 20 in singles.

Pfister is currently the Director of Tennis and Fitness at Stockdale Country Club in Bakersfield. He has twice been selected as the U.S. Professional Tennis Association California Division Pro of the Year.

May 19, 2010

Coaching Philosophy






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Hank Pfister - Bio

Bakersfield-born Hank Pfister was a fixture on the pro tennis circuit with achievements as both a singles and doubles player.

Born in 1953, Pfister was heavily influenced by his tennis coach father. At five years old he was hitting tennis balls and by age seven he had played in his first local tournament.

While attending Bakersfield High School his talent led him to club tournaments in Los Angeles. Pfister later attended Bakersfield College before receiving a full scholarship to San Jose State University, where he was an NCAA Division I First Team All-American in 1976.

In 1977 he began a pro career that included French Open doubles championships in 1978 and 1980, and Association of Tennis Professional singles titles in Maui in 1981 and Rhode Island in 1982.

At his peak, Pfister was rated in the ATP top 10 among doubles players and the top 20 in singles.

Pfister is currently the Director of Tennis and Fitness at Stockdale Country Club in Bakersfield. He has twice been selected as the U.S. Professional Tennis Association California Division Pro of the Year.


April 13, 2010

How do you win or lose points?






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By the time he was 17, Teltscher was ranked in the top 10 nationally in junior rankings.

He was an All-American in his only year at UCLA (1978), which he attended on a tennis scholarship.

That same year he defeated Onny Parun to capture the Benson & Hedges New Zealand Open at Stanley Street, Auckland, in a match best remembered for a controversial overrule midway through the third set.
[edit] Pro career

In 1979, Teltscher turned pro. A worldwide top 10 player from 1980-82, he was ranked no lower than #15 from through 1984. He reached his highest singles ATP-ranking on May 7, 1982, when he became ranked #6 in the world.

He reached the French Open doubles final with partner Terry Moor in 1981, and won the French Open mixed doubles title with Barbara Jordan two years later. He also reached the quarterfinals at the U.S. Open three times (1980, 1981, and 1983 -- losing to Jimmy Connors all three years), and the quarterfinals at the 1983 Australian Open. In March 1987 he beat Connors, ranked # 8 in the world, in Chicago 6-3, 6-1. He won 10 singles titles during his professional career, which ended in 1988.

Looking back at his career, Teltscher expressed pride at the time his honesty took over from his competitive nature. During a match at the Masters Tournament against Vitas Gerulaitis, his racket grazed the net while it was match point. No one, including Gerulitis, was aware of the rule violation except for Teltscher. Rather than let it pass, however, he informed the judges of the infraction and lost the point, and maybe the match, because of his honesty. His parents are most proud of him for that action.
[edit] Davis Cup

Teltscher was on the U.S. Davis Cup team in 1982, 1983, and 1985. He had a combined record of 5-4 in singles play, and helped the U.S. win the Davis Cup in 1982 over France.


April 10, 2010

Fear and Risk Taking






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Don Greene, Ph.D. www.dongreene.com

Is performance anxiety affecting you?

Struggling with your nerves? Having trouble winning an audition or doing well when it matters most? Do you really know what's keeping you from performing your best?

First you need to understand your particular tendencies under pressure. Take the Sample Inventory to get a quick glimpse of how the process works. For a more in-depth view, take the complete Performance Skills Inventory and receive an individual performance profile of your strengths and weaknesses. You'll also receive a customized program of success strategies to help you develop the skills you need to do your best.

One proven strategy, Centering, helps performers not only control their anxiety, but actually make it work for them. Rather than trying to suppress nervous energy with beta-blockers, Centering uses adrenaline to help create dynamic and inspiring performances and winning auditions. Download the Centering audio to learn this powerful strategy in seven days.

You can read one of my books: Audition Success: An Olympic Sports Psychologist Teaches Performing Artists How to Win; Performance Success: Performing Your Best Under Pressure; or Fight Your Fear and Win. Each offers a revolutionary approach to training yourself to thrive under pressure because of the high energy, not in spite of it.

This is what I teach. I'm a performance coach. I've trained thousands of artists and athletes to do their absolute best when it mattered most. You too can learn. If you'd like to schedule a coaching session, via internet videoconferencing, we can personally address your questions, explore options, and find solutions.

April 5, 2010

Video taping matches






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In this video, ATP ranked player Dan Battistone explains the importance of using video analysis to improve your game. After the brothers starting video taping matches and analyzing their games and strokes a few year's ago, they noticed their ATP rank improve dramatically.

March 16, 2010

Building a Point






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BTC Head Tennis Professional Lynne Rolley brings 35 years of teaching and coaching at every level. Her extensive resume includes Junior National Championships and top ten National rankings in singles and doubles. Lynne has held Tennis Director positions at Sleepy Hollow and the Moraga Country Club and has been Head Coach for the St. Mary's Men's Tennis Team and the Oakland Aces of World Team Tennis. Until recently, she was the Director of Women's Tennis for the United States Tennis Association and has worked with Jennifer Capriati, Lindsay Davenport, Lisa Raymond, Chanda Rubin, Alexandra Stevenson, Ashley Harkelroad and Mike Bauer among others.

Besides private lessons, Lynne offers Summer Camps and year round clinics to juniors of all ages. Please click here to see the schedule of clinics presently available.

March 5, 2010

Simplest is Best - Control, Consistency, Depth & Power - How to Manage Mistakes






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Dr. Jack Groppel is an internationally recognized authority and pioneer in the science of human performance, and an expert in fitness and nutrition. Dr. Groppel served as an Adjunct Professor of Management at the J.L. Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University for several years and continues to instruct courses at the University in a supplementary role.

Dr. Groppel authored The Corporate Athlete book on achieving the pinnacle of corporate performance and co-authored The Corporate Athlete Advantage. He developed the Corporate Athlete® concept for his training program while serving as an associate professor of kinesiology and bioengineering at the University of Illinois helping both business executives and athletes increase performance levels. In 1992, he combined his program with Dr. Jim Loehr to form the Human Performance Institute, Inc.

A Fellow in the American College of Sports Medicine, Dr. Groppel is also a Board certified nutritionist in the American College of Nutrition and a former Research Associate to the U.S. Olympic Training Center. He currently serves as Vice President on the National Board of Directors of the United States Professional Tennis Association. Dr. Groppel also served as the Chairman of the National Sport Science Committee of the United States Tennis Association for 16 years.

March 3, 2010

Stress, Positive Physical Response & Recovering Energy







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Dr. Jack Groppel is an internationally recognized authority and pioneer in the science of human performance, and an expert in fitness and nutrition. Dr. Groppel served as an Adjunct Professor of Management at the J.L. Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University for several years and continues to instruct courses at the University in a supplementary role.

Dr. Groppel authored The Corporate Athlete book on achieving the pinnacle of corporate performance and co-authored The Corporate Athlete Advantage. He developed the Corporate Athlete® concept for his training program while serving as an associate professor of kinesiology and bioengineering at the University of Illinois helping both business executives and athletes increase performance levels. In 1992, he combined his program with Dr. Jim Loehr to form the Human Performance Institute, Inc.

A Fellow in the American College of Sports Medicine, Dr. Groppel is also a Board certified nutritionist in the American College of Nutrition and a former Research Associate to the U.S. Olympic Training Center. He currently serves as Vice President on the National Board of Directors of the United States Professional Tennis Association. Dr. Groppel also served as the Chairman of the National Sport Science Committee of the United States Tennis Association for 16 years.

February 26, 2010

First Step, Averages, Mental Toughness







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Dr. Jack Groppel is an internationally recognized authority and pioneer in the science of human performance, and an expert in fitness and nutrition. Dr. Groppel served as an Adjunct Professor of Management at the J.L. Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University for several years and continues to instruct courses at the University in a supplementary role.

Dr. Groppel authored The Corporate Athlete book on achieving the pinnacle of corporate performance and co-authored The Corporate Athlete Advantage. He developed the Corporate Athlete® concept for his training program while serving as an associate professor of kinesiology and bioengineering at the University of Illinois helping both business executives and athletes increase performance levels. In 1992, he combined his program with Dr. Jim Loehr to form the Human Performance Institute, Inc.

A Fellow in the American College of Sports Medicine, Dr. Groppel is also a Board certified nutritionist in the American College of Nutrition and a former Research Associate to the U.S. Olympic Training Center. He currently serves as Vice President on the National Board of Directors of the United States Professional Tennis Association. Dr. Groppel also served as the Chairman of the National Sport Science Committee of the United States Tennis Association for 16 years.

February 24, 2010

Stroke Comparison






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Dr. Jack Groppel is an internationally recognized authority and pioneer in the science of human performance, and an expert in fitness and nutrition. Dr. Groppel served as an Adjunct Professor of Management at the J.L. Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University for several years and continues to instruct courses at the University in a supplementary role.

Dr. Groppel authored The Corporate Athlete book on achieving the pinnacle of corporate performance and co-authored The Corporate Athlete Advantage. He developed the Corporate Athlete® concept for his training program while serving as an associate professor of kinesiology and bioengineering at the University of Illinois helping both business executives and athletes increase performance levels. In 1992, he combined his program with Dr. Jim Loehr to form the Human Performance Institute, Inc.

A Fellow in the American College of Sports Medicine, Dr. Groppel is also a Board certified nutritionist in the American College of Nutrition and a former Research Associate to the U.S. Olympic Training Center. He currently serves as Vice President on the National Board of Directors of the United States Professional Tennis Association. Dr. Groppel also served as the Chairman of the National Sport Science Committee of the United States Tennis Association for 16 years.

February 23, 2010

Habit Rules







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Dr. Jack Groppel is an internationally recognized authority and pioneer in the science of human performance, and an expert in fitness and nutrition. Dr. Groppel served as an Adjunct Professor of Management at the J.L. Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University for several years and continues to instruct courses at the University in a supplementary role.

Dr. Groppel authored The Corporate Athlete book on achieving the pinnacle of corporate performance and co-authored The Corporate Athlete Advantage. He developed the Corporate Athlete® concept for his training program while serving as an associate professor of kinesiology and bioengineering at the University of Illinois helping both business executives and athletes increase performance levels. In 1992, he combined his program with Dr. Jim Loehr to form the Human Performance Institute, Inc.

A Fellow in the American College of Sports Medicine, Dr. Groppel is also a Board certified nutritionist in the American College of Nutrition and a former Research Associate to the U.S. Olympic Training Center. He currently serves as Vice President on the National Board of Directors of the United States Professional Tennis Association. Dr. Groppel also served as the Chairman of the National Sport Science Committee of the United States Tennis Association for 16 years.

January 26, 2010

Q & A with Eliot






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By the time he was 17, Teltscher was ranked in the top 10 nationally in junior rankings.

He was an All-American in his only year at UCLA (1978), which he attended on a tennis scholarship.

That same year he defeated Onny Parun to capture the Benson & Hedges New Zealand Open at Stanley Street, Auckland, in a match best remembered for a controversial overrule midway through the third set.
[edit] Pro career

In 1979, Teltscher turned pro. A worldwide top 10 player from 1980-82, he was ranked no lower than #15 from through 1984. He reached his highest singles ATP-ranking on May 7, 1982, when he became ranked #6 in the world.

He reached the French Open doubles final with partner Terry Moor in 1981, and won the French Open mixed doubles title with Barbara Jordan two years later. He also reached the quarterfinals at the U.S. Open three times (1980, 1981, and 1983 -- losing to Jimmy Connors all three years), and the quarterfinals at the 1983 Australian Open. In March 1987 he beat Connors, ranked # 8 in the world, in Chicago 6-3, 6-1. He won 10 singles titles during his professional career, which ended in 1988.

Looking back at his career, Teltscher expressed pride at the time his honesty took over from his competitive nature. During a match at the Masters Tournament against Vitas Gerulaitis, his racket grazed the net while it was match point. No one, including Gerulitis, was aware of the rule violation except for Teltscher. Rather than let it pass, however, he informed the judges of the infraction and lost the point, and maybe the match, because of his honesty. His parents are most proud of him for that action.
[edit] Davis Cup

Teltscher was on the U.S. Davis Cup team in 1982, 1983, and 1985. He had a combined record of 5-4 in singles play, and helped the U.S. win the Davis Cup in 1982 over France.


January 25, 2010

Analyzing a Stroke






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Paul Roetert is the Managing Director of the United States Tennis Association's Player Development Program. In addition, he serves as Tournament Director of the U.S. Open Junior Tennis Championships. Before re-joining the USTA in November, 2001, Paul spent two years as the Executive Director of the American Sport Education Program. Prior to that position he spent eleven years as the Administrator of Sport Science for the USTA where he developed the sport science program. He also served as Vice Chairman of the sport science committee.

Paul has published extensively in the field of tennis, including two books, 16 book chapters and over 100 articles. He is a Fellow in the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), a member of the United States Professional Tennis Association (USPTA) and the Professional Registry (PTR). In 1998 he received the PTR's Plagenhoef Award for sport science; in 1999 the Editorial Excellence Award from the National Strength and Conditioning Association for his work on the Journal of Strength and Conditioning and Research; in 2000 the Outstanding Alumni award from the University of Connecticut. He is also the 2002 Educational Merit Award recipient from the International Tennis Hall of Fame for outstanding service to the game of tennis.

Paul holds a Ph.D. in biomechanics from the University of Connecticut. Originally from the Netherlands, he and his wife Barbara reside in Miami, Florida.


November 6, 2009

Transforming the life of a child through tennis (Part 2)






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Bernard Sewell - Transforming the life of a child through tennis

A native of Selma, Alabama, Coach Bernard Sewell has been involved in tennis for over 30 years. From 1997 till present he has been Head Tennis Coach (Men and Women) at Alabama State University. Coach Sewell's accomplishments include leading his team to winning Southwestern Athletic Conference Championship (1999). For his exceptional leadership, Coach Sewell has received Southwestern Athletic Conference Coach of the Year (1999). Prior to his university coaching career, Coach Sewell was a Director of Tennis at Montgomery YMCA (1988-1996) and worked as an Associate Tennis Professional at Nick Bolletteri Tennis Academy(1983-1987).
Coach Sewell's activities include, among others, establishing The Selma-Montgomery-Tuskegee Tennis, Inc. (1996) and organizing The International Cultural Day at Bell Road YMCA involving over 80 countries (1995). He was selected by Mayor James Perkins (City of Selma) and Dr. James Carter (Selma City School System) to create, organize, and write curriculum for tennis program for the children of Selma. Coach Sewell was also chosen by neighborhood presidents of Woodcrest, Southlawn, and Mobile Heights communities to create and organize a tennis instructional program for the communities.

Coach Sewell is an Active Member of the United States Professional Tennis Association (USPTA), the Southern Professional Tennis Association, the Alabama Professional Tennis Association, the United States Tennis Association and the Intercollegiate Tennis Association.
He was selected by Dr. David Porter of USPTA to sit as the National Multicultural Committee Chair.

Coach Sewell has a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration and Computer Science from Alabama State University. He is also an M.Ed. Candidate in Secondary Education (English).

November 5, 2009

Transforming the life of a child through tennis (Part 1)






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Bernard Sewell - Transforming the life of a child through tennis

A native of Selma, Alabama, Coach Bernard Sewell has been involved in tennis for over 30 years. From 1997 till present he has been Head Tennis Coach (Men and Women) at Alabama State University. Coach Sewell's accomplishments include leading his team to winning Southwestern Athletic Conference Championship (1999). For his exceptional leadership, Coach Sewell has received Southwestern Athletic Conference Coach of the Year (1999). Prior to his university coaching career, Coach Sewell was a Director of Tennis at Montgomery YMCA (1988-1996) and worked as an Associate Tennis Professional at Nick Bolletteri Tennis Academy(1983-1987).
Coach Sewell's activities include, among others, establishing The Selma-Montgomery-Tuskegee Tennis, Inc. (1996) and organizing The International Cultural Day at Bell Road YMCA involving over 80 countries (1995). He was selected by Mayor James Perkins (City of Selma) and Dr. James Carter (Selma City School System) to create, organize, and write curriculum for tennis program for the children of Selma. Coach Sewell was also chosen by neighborhood presidents of Woodcrest, Southlawn, and Mobile Heights communities to create and organize a tennis instructional program for the communities.

Coach Sewell is an Active Member of the United States Professional Tennis Association (USPTA), the Southern Professional Tennis Association, the Alabama Professional Tennis Association, the United States Tennis Association and the Intercollegiate Tennis Association.
He was selected by Dr. David Porter of USPTA to sit as the National Multicultural Committee Chair.

Coach Sewell has a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration and Computer Science from Alabama State University. He is also an M.Ed. Candidate in Secondary Education (English).

August 28, 2009

Strike Zone







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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu, Hawaii explains the strike zones in tennis.

As confusing as the strike zone may seem, it really isn't. There are specific reasons why it's different today than it was in generations past.

Strike zone comes from baseball. Your preferred strike zone in tennis is determined by many factors: your grip, your stance, your height and the surface you mostly play on. Also, the strike zones vary from the shoulder to the knees (preferred strike zone), from around the head to the knees (advanced players) and from just above the head to just above the ankles (expert players). Your predicting and intercepting skills determine whether or not you can hit the ball in your ideal strike zone.

The taller the player, the larger the strike zone.

August 18, 2009

Common Injuries







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DR. MARK KOVACS, PhD., CSCS
Senior Manager of Strength & Conditioning/Sports Science
USTA Training Center in Boca Raton, FL

Dr. Kovacs was an accomplished player and coach before transitioning to a career as a sport science expert. As a player he was a collegiate All-American and NCAA champion at Auburn University. He has a Masters degree in Exercise Science from Auburn and a Ph.D. in Exercise Physiology from The University of Alabama. Dr. Kovacs is an Associate Editor of the Strength and Conditioning Journal and co-author of tennis book titled "Tennis Training-Enhancing On-Court Performance". Mark is a certified strength and conditioning specialist through the NSCA, certified Health/Fitness Instructor through the American College of Sports Medicine, USPTA certified coach and United States Track and Field Level II Sprints Coach. Before starting with the USTA, Mark was an Assistant Professor of Exercise Science and Wellness at Jacksonville State University.

August 5, 2009

Bottom Up Warm Up






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DR. MARK KOVACS, PhD., CSCS
Senior Manager of Strength & Conditioning/Sports Science
USTA Training Center in Boca Raton, FL

Dr. Kovacs was an accomplished player and coach before transitioning to a career as a sport science expert. As a player he was a collegiate All-American and NCAA champion at Auburn University. He has a Masters degree in Exercise Science from Auburn and a Ph.D. in Exercise Physiology from The University of Alabama. Dr. Kovacs is an Associate Editor of the Strength and Conditioning Journal and co-author of tennis book titled "Tennis Training-Enhancing On-Court Performance". Mark is a certified strength and conditioning specialist through the NSCA, certified Health/Fitness Instructor through the American College of Sports Medicine, USPTA certified coach and United States Track and Field Level II Sprints Coach. Before starting with the USTA, Mark was an Assistant Professor of Exercise Science and Wellness at Jacksonville State University.

May 25, 2008

Alligator eyes






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School explains a concept known as "Alligator Eyes." He attended a 2 day Alexander Technique workshop held at Punahou School where he learned this concept plus many more to help with peak performance. The Alexander Technique is of particular use to performing artists, athletes, actors, singers, dancers, musicians, and martial artists.

Some well-known people who have studied the Alexander Technique include George Bernard Shaw, Aldous Huxley, Robertson Davies, Paul McCartney, Sting, Paul Newman, William Hurt, Robin Williams, educator John Dewey, and Nobel prizewinner for Medicine Nikolas Tinbergen. For more information about the Alexander Technique, please visit the Alexander Technique website.

April 9, 2008

Vectors and Swing Speed







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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu, Hawaii explains the myth of hitting through a horizontal line during the contact point. A vector is formed on every shot in tennis, therefore, it is not impossible to calculate all the vectors on every point, however, it would be very labor intensive to do so. Due to the changing heights at every contact point, the vectors will need to change to adjust to these ever changing heights.

Also, in this video, with the help of Mike Gearen, Physics Teacher at Punahou School, we calculate the warm-up swing speed of a professional player.

March 21, 2008

Best footwork drills







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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Head Tennis Professional, Punahou School, Honolulu Hawaii shows the best footwork drills for tennis.


March 9, 2008

No pain, no gain?






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Todd Ellenbecker, USPTA, Prince Advisory Staff Member is the ATP Director of Sports Medicine. Ellenbecker remains the clinic director at Physiotherapy Associates Scottsdale Sports Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona, and will work with the other physical therapists, physicians and players on the ATP tour providing injury preventions evaluations. Ellenbecker and Paul Roetert, Ph.D., USPTA, also recently published the second edtion of "Complete Conditioning for Tennis," which is available from Human Kinetics Publishers.


TODD S. ELLENBECKER, DPT, MS, SCS, OCS, CSCS, USPTA
CURRICULUM VITAE

EDUCATION:
Doctorate of Physical Therapy
Massachusetts General Hospital: Institute of Health Professions, 2006
Master of Science - Exercise Physiology
Arizona State University, 1989
Bachelor of Science - Physical Therapy, Graduated with Honors
University of Wisconsin - LaCrosse, 1985

SPECIALIZATION:
Sports Clinical Specialist (SCS) (1991 - Present).
Orthopaedic Clinical Specialist (OCS) (2000 - Present).

CERTIFICATIONS:
Certified Tennis Teaching Professional, USPTA (P-1), (1990-Present)
Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist, NSCA (1990-Present)
American Heart Association CPR (Continuous)
American Red Cross Emergency Responder (2001-Present).

PROFESSIONAL COMMITTEES:
Chairman, United States Tennis Association Sports Science Committee (2003-Present)
Vice Chairman, USTA Sports Science Committee (2002)
Member, USTA Sports Science Committee (1989-2002)
FACULTY APPOINTMENTS:
Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions, Faculty member (1999-Present).
U of Wisconsin-LaCrosse, Adjunct Clinical Professor, Physical Therapy (2001-Present).

ADDITIONAL APPOINTMENTS:
British Tennis Coaches Association Honorary International Member (2006-Present)
North American Journal of Sports Physical Therapy Editorial Board (2005-Present)
Chairman of Physiotherapy Associates Institutional Review Board(IRB) (2004-Present)
Member NSCA Student Research Grant Subcommittee (1996-2002)
Chairman of the APTA Sports Section's Shoulder Special Interest Group (1995-2002)
Member APTA's Subcommittee for Research Proposals and Abstracts (1995-1997)

CONSULTANT:
Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP Tennis Tour) (1990-2007).
Theraband Research Advisory Committee (TRAC), Hygenic Corporation (1997-Present).
Arizona State University Men's Tennis Team (2000-Present).
Milwaukee Brewers Baseball Club (1989-Present).
San Francisco Giants Baseball Club (1989-1995).
Oakland Athletics Baseball Club (1989-1993).


March 8, 2008

Muscle Imbalance







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Todd Ellenbecker, USPTA, Prince Advisory Staff Member is the ATP Director of Sports Medicine. Ellenbecker remains the clinic director at Physiotherapy Associates Scottsdale Sports Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona, and will work with the other physical therapists, physicians and players on the ATP tour providing injury preventions evaluations. Ellenbecker and Paul Roetert, Ph.D., USPTA, also recently published the second edition of "Complete Conditioning for Tennis," which is available from Human Kinetics Publishers.

TODD S. ELLENBECKER, DPT, MS, SCS, OCS, CSCS, USPTA
CURRICULUM VITAE

EDUCATION:
Doctorate of Physical Therapy
Massachusetts General Hospital: Institute of Health Professions, 2006
Master of Science - Exercise Physiology
Arizona State University, 1989
Bachelor of Science - Physical Therapy, Graduated with Honors
University of Wisconsin - LaCrosse, 1985

SPECIALIZATION:
Sports Clinical Specialist (SCS) (1991 - Present).
Orthopaedic Clinical Specialist (OCS) (2000 - Present).

CERTIFICATIONS:
Certified Tennis Teaching Professional, USPTA (P-1), (1990-Present)
Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist, NSCA (1990-Present)
American Heart Association CPR (Continuous)
American Red Cross Emergency Responder (2001-Present).

PROFESSIONAL COMMITTEES:
Chairman, United States Tennis Association Sports Science Committee (2003-Present)
Vice Chairman, USTA Sports Science Committee (2002)
Member, USTA Sports Science Committee (1989-2002)
FACULTY APPOINTMENTS:
Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions, Faculty member (1999-Present).
U of Wisconsin-LaCrosse, Adjunct Clinical Professor, Physical Therapy (2001-Present).

ADDITIONAL APPOINTMENTS:
British Tennis Coaches Association Honorary International Member (2006-Present)
North American Journal of Sports Physical Therapy Editorial Board (2005-Present)
Chairman of Physiotherapy Associates Institutional Review Board(IRB) (2004-Present)
Member NSCA Student Research Grant Subcommittee (1996-2002)
Chairman of the APTA Sports Section's Shoulder Special Interest Group (1995-2002)
Member APTA's Subcommittee for Research Proposals and Abstracts (1995-1997)

CONSULTANT:
Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP Tennis Tour) (1990-2007).
Theraband Research Advisory Committee (TRAC), Hygenic Corporation (1997-Present).
Arizona State University Men's Tennis Team (2000-Present).
Milwaukee Brewers Baseball Club (1989-Present).
San Francisco Giants Baseball Club (1989-1995).
Oakland Athletics Baseball Club (1989-1993).

November 11, 2007

Transition Balls







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Dave Porter, Ed.D., Mens and Womens Head Tennis Coach - BYU, Hawaii shows a mini tennis warm up using 2 different size foam balls. Players hit over 100 balls in a short space of time which speeds up the warm up process. Larger balls also force the players to hit through their shots with a longer followthrough.

June 15, 2007

Mirror Image







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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Wilson TEAM Member, Balle de Match Team Member shows a reverse image of some professional players. If you examine Nadal closely, he looks like a natural right hander. Please wait, loading......

June 5, 2007

Controlling Emotions






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Anne Smith, Ph.D gives a lecture on controlling fear and emotions. For more information on the MACH4 system visit www.annesmithtennis.com

June 4, 2007

Circular Motion






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Wilson TEAM Member, "YIP" Team Member explains why 2 circular motions should be used when hitting the groundstrokes.

April 17, 2007

Being Centered






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John Nelson, University of Hawaii Men's Tennis Coach shows how important "Balance" and being "Centered" is in the game of tennis. John compares the martial arts with the game of tennis.

April 16, 2007

Got Lead?







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Pun Pod shows a quick tip on applying lead tape to the racket head and handle. Many Professionals "tweak" their rackets by adding lead tape.

April 8, 2007

Adjust Your Eye Level






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Lee Couillard, USPTA, Wilson TEAM Member and "YIP" Team Member shows why it is important to adjust your eye level in tennis.

February 9, 2007

All About Balance

Ryan Lindstedt, Freestyle skier and Lee Couillard, USPTA show a comparison of skiing and tennis. It's all about balance.


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January 22, 2007

Shot Tolerance

Lee Couillard, USPTA, Punahou School, Wilson and "YIP" TEAM member explains shot tolerance. Eliot Teltscher is credited with this method of scouting your opponent's shot tolerance.


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December 7, 2006

Mental Training

Brad Yates, HI Level Coaching Services demonstrates 6 steps to perform on changeovers.

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November 11, 2006

Changing Direction

David T. Porter Ed.D., USPTA Master Professional, HEAD Advisory Staff Member and Head Men's and Women's Tennis Coach for BYU-Hawaii. Dave shows two drills making players change direction.


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November 3, 2006

Predicting & Intercepting

David T. Porter Ed.D., USPTA Master Professional, HEAD Advisory Staff Member and Head Men's and Women's Tennis Coach for BYU-Hawaii talks about predicting and intercepting.


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October 19, 2006

Mach 4

Anne Smith, Ph.D., won her place in the history books of all-time winners with 10 Grand Slam championships in doubles and mixed doubles from 1980 to 1984. She is one of only 20 women in the history of the Open Era of tennis who have won 10 or more Grand Slam titles-and most of those were by women before 1950. She has won three US Open titles, two Wimbledon titles, four French Open titles and one Australian Open title. She has been a member of the Wightman Cup and Federation Cup teams. She was ranked No.1 in the world in doubles in 1980 and 1981 and reached a career-high No.12 in singles in 1982. Anne was a member of three World TeamTennis Championship Teams – the Boston Lobsters, the San Antonio Racquets, and the Dallas Stars. She went on to win the 35-and-over women’s doubles at the U.S. Open and Wimbledon in 1997.

As a junior, Anne was No.1 in Texas from the 12s through the 18s. When she was 15, she was No.1 in Texas in both 16 and 18 singles. At age 17, Anne went to Paris and became the first American to win the French Open Junior Singles Championship. She holds 21 national junior and adult titles. In Texas, Anne was awarded the coveted Mary Lowden Award for sportsmanship four years in a row from 1974-1977. She also received the Maureen Connolly Brinker award in 1977 for the most outstanding full season performance in the 18-and-under division in the U.S. Anne was born and raised in Dallas, Texas and has been inducted into the Texas Tennis Hall of Fame.

After her active tennis career, Anne returned to Trinity University and earned her Bachelor’s degree. She then enrolled at the University of Texas at Austin where she completed her doctorate in Educational Psychology with a specialty in School Psychology. She is licensed to practice in Texas, Massachusetts, and Arizona. Anne practiced school psychology in the Judson Independent School District in San Antonio, Texas before moving to Boston where she was the Director of the Learning Center for Dean College in Franklin, Massachusetts. She recently moved to Phoenix where she is coaching and practicing psychology. Anne still maintains her Boston connection where she is the Coach of the World TeamTennis Boston Lobsters and the mental training consultant for Harvard University’s women’s tennis team. The Lobsters reached the playoffs as a first year franchise, and Harvard became the first Ivy League school to be ranked nationally in the Top 10. She is a USPTA Pro 1 and a member of the Head/Penn Racquet Sports Speaker’s Bureau.

Anne is playing on the women’s tour again at the age of 46. She began her comeback in January 2005. After only nine tournaments, she has reached the semi-finals in doubles four times, and she won her first doubles tour title in June 2005 after being off of the tour for 14 years. Anne is the author of The MACH 4 Mental Training SystemTM: A Handbook for Athletes, Coaches and Parents.

To contact Anne for further information about her books and video or to schedule her for a presentation to your team, school or company you may contact her by phone at 480-272-5085 or by email at annelssp@aol.com


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October 3, 2006

USTA Coaches Recreation Workshop

Leilani Magee, USPTA, USTA Hawaii's Director of Community Service. USTA's promo video.

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September 29, 2006

Are you going Pro?

Lee Couillard, USPTA, Wilson TEAM Member compares foot speed between Amateurs and Professionals.
Here are the USTA's fitness results from the 16 & under Girls area training centers. (90%)
Sit and Reach 9.3, Sit Ups 61, Push Ups 47, Vertical Jump 19.0, Spider Test 16.6, Sideways Shuffle 6.0, Hexagon Test 9.9, 20yd Dash 3.0, Mile & 1/2 Run 10:15.

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September 25, 2006

Legs Are Everything

Lee Couillard, USPTA, Wilson TEAM Member shows a footwork comparison of Professional Women tennis players and USTA Level II National 18's Girl's.


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August 14, 2006

Federer's pressure

Lee Couillard, USPTA, Wilson TEAM Member examines point by point, a tie-breaker won by Roger Federer.


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August 7, 2006

Strength Training with Bands

Todd S. Ellenbecker, MS, PT, SCS, OCS, CSCS

Todd Ellenbecker is a Chairman of the USTA Sport Science Committee and is also a physical therapist and clinic director of Physiotherapy Associates Scottsdale Sports Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona. He received his degree in physical therapy from the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse in 1985 and a master's degree in exercise physiology from Arizona State University in 1989.
In addition, he is a certified sports clinical specialist, an orthopaedic clinical specialist by the American Physical Therapy Association, and a certified strength and conditioning specialist. He is a certified USPTA tennis teaching professional, and is the chairman of the USTA National Sport Science Committee.
Todd has conducted and published research primarily on upper extremity athletes, with a specific emphasis on the musculoskeletal adaptations in elite tennis players. He has conducted research and lectured internationally on shoulder and elbow rehabilitation, as well as training techniques to enhance performance and prevent injuries in tennis players.
He is the author of several books, "The Elbow in Sport", "Complete Conditioning for Tennis", "Closed Kinetic Chain Exercise", and Examination of the Shoulder", and is the editor of the second edition of "Knee Ligament Rehabilitation", and co-editor of "The Scientific and Clinical Application of Elastic Resistance".

Mike Nishihara, USTA, Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist

The newest member of the Coaching Education and Sport Science staff is Mike Nishihara a certified strength and conditioning specialist. Mike is certified by the National Strength and Conditioning Association and holds a Master's of Science degree in Kinesiology from the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana.

While in graduate school, Mike served as Dr. Jack Groppel's teaching and research assistant and was also a part-time strength and conditioning coach for the varsity teams. Mike has worked at Saddlebrook Resort as the Director of Fitness and Sports Conditioning and at the National Institute for Fitness and Sport as the Director for the Center of Athletic Development.

He has had the opportunity to work with numerous junior and professional athletes from a variety of different sports. Some of the professional tennis players Mike has worked with are Pete Sampras, Martina Hingis, Jennifer Capriati, Chanda Rubin, Jelena Dokic, Elena Dementieva, and James Blake.


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July 15, 2006

Medicine Ball (2)

Todd Ellenbecker, Mike Nishihara and Bobby Bernstein demonstrate exercises using the Medicine Ball at the High Performance Work shop held and the University of Hawaii.

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June 28, 2006

Changeovers

Brad Yates, HiLevel Coaching service, talks about 6 important steps to be used on the changeovers.


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Learning New Skills

David T. Porter Ed.D. USPTA Master Professional, Head Men's and Women's Tennis Coach for BYU-Hawaii talks about teaching new skills.


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June 26, 2006

Eyes, Ears, Receptors

Todd Ellenbecker talks about the key senses of balance.

Todd Ellenbecker is a Chairman of the USTA Sport Science Committee and is also a physical therapist and clinic director of Physiotherapy Associates Scottsdale Sports Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona. He received his degree in physical therapy from the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse in 1985 and a master's degree in exercise physiology from Arizona State University in 1989.

In addition, he is a certified sports clinical specialist, an orthopaedic clinical specialist by the American Physical Therapy Association, and a certified strength and conditioning specialist. He is a certified USPTA tennis teaching professional, and is the chairman of the USTA National Sport Science Committee.

Todd has conducted and published research primarily on upper extremity athletes, with a specific emphasis on the musculoskeletal adaptations in elite tennis players. He has conducted research and lectured internationally on shoulder and elbow rehabilitation, as well as training techniques to enhance performance and prevent injuries in tennis players.

He is the author of several books, "The Elbow in Sport", "Complete Conditioning for Tennis", "Closed Kinetic Chain Exercise", and Examination of the Shoulder", and is the editor of the second edition of "Knee Ligament Rehabilitation", and co-editor of "The Scientific and Clinical Application of Elastic Resistance

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June 24, 2006

Medicine Ball (1)

Mike Nishihara and Todd Ellenbecker show two medicine ball workouts. Mike is the newest member of the USTA Coaching Education and Sport Science staff. Mike is a certified strength and conditioning specialist. Mike is certified by the National Strength and Conditioning Association and holds a Master's of Science degree in Kinesiology from the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana.

While in graduate school, Mike served as Dr. Jack Groppel's teaching and research assistant and was also a part-time strength and conditioning coach for the varsity teams. Mike has worked at Saddlebrook Resort as the Director of Fitness and Sports Conditioning and at the National Institute for Fitness and Sport as the Director for the Center of Athletic Development.

He has had the opportunity to work with numerous junior and professional athletes from a variety of different sports. Some of the professional tennis players Mike has worked with are Pete Sampras, Martina Hingis, Jennifer Capriati, Chanda Rubin, Jelena Dokic, Elena Dementieva, and James Blake.

Todd Ellenbecker is a Chairman of the USTA Sport Science Committee and is also a physical therapist and clinic director of Physiotherapy Associates Scottsdale Sports Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona. He received his degree in physical therapy from the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse in 1985 and a master's degree in exercise physiology from Arizona State University in 1989.

In addition, he is a certified sports clinical specialist, an orthopaedic clinical specialist by the American Physical Therapy Association, and a certified strength and conditioning specialist. He is a certified USPTA tennis teaching professional, and is the chairman of the USTA National Sport Science Committee.

Todd has conducted and published research primarily on upper extremity athletes, with a specific emphasis on the musculoskeletal adaptations in elite tennis players. He has conducted research and lectured internationally on shoulder and elbow rehabilitation, as well as training techniques to enhance performance and prevent injuries in tennis players.

He is the author of several books, "The Elbow in Sport", "Complete Conditioning for Tennis", "Closed Kinetic Chain Exercise", and Examination of the Shoulder", and is the editor of the second edition of "Knee Ligament Rehabilitation", and co-editor of "The Scientific and Clinical Application of Elastic Resistance".



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June 21, 2006

Hyperangulation

Todd Ellenbecker is a Chairman of the USTA Sport Science Committee and is also a physical therapist and clinic director of Physiotherapy Associates Scottsdale Sports Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona. He received his degree in physical therapy from the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse in 1985 and a master's degree in exercise physiology from Arizona State University in 1989.

In addition, he is a certified sports clinical specialist, an orthopaedic clinical specialist by the American Physical Therapy Association, and a certified strength and conditioning specialist. He is a certified USPTA tennis teaching professional, and is the chairman of the USTA National Sport Science Committee.

Todd has conducted and published research primarily on upper extremity athletes, with a specific emphasis on the musculoskeletal adaptations in elite tennis players. He has conducted research and lectured internationally on shoulder and elbow rehabilitation, as well as training techniques to enhance performance and prevent injuries in tennis players.

He is the author of several books, "The Elbow in Sport", "Complete Conditioning for Tennis", "Closed Kinetic Chain Exercise", and Examination of the Shoulder", and is the editor of the second edition of "Knee Ligament Rehabilitation", and co-editor of "The Scientific and Clinical Application of Elastic Resistance".

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June 20, 2006

Monster Walk

Mike Nishihara is the Strength and Conditioning Coach for the USA Tennis High Performance program. Nishihara is based at the USA Tennis High Performance Training Center in Key Biscayne, Fla.

Nishihara is responsible for planning and implementing physical testing and training programs for players and to educate players and coaches on issues of strength training, conditioning, injury prevention and treatment. The USA Tennis High Performance program is charged with facilitating the development of world-class American tennis champions.

Nishihara brings more than 15 years of experience in fitness testing, sport science and strength and conditioning training. Most recently he was Director of Fitness and Sports Conditioning at the Saddlebrook Resort in Wesley Chapel, Fla., where he oversaw operations, programs and services provided by the fitness center. He has worked with many professional tennis players over the years, including Pete Sampras, Martina Hingis, Jennifer Capriati, Chanda Rubin, James Blake, Mardy Fish, Jelena Dokic and Elena Dementieva.

"Mike brings a wealth of knowledge in strength and conditioning and the sports sciences that will benefit our players and coaches training in Key Biscayne and throughout the country," said Paul Lubbers, Director, Coaching Education, USA Tennis High Performance. "He has a proven track record with world-class athletes in tennis and other disciplines."

Before working at Saddlebrook, Nishihara was Director of the Center for Athletic Development at the National Institute for Fitness and Sport in Indianapolis, where he developed athletic programs and directed Athletic Development Camps. He also has worked with NFL and NBA players, and worked with the Indiana Pacers strength and conditioning department.

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June 19, 2006

Hip Stretch

Todd Ellenbecker is a Chairman of the USTA Sport Science Committee and is also a physical therapist and clinic director of Physiotherapy Associates Scottsdale Sports Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona. He received his degree in physical therapy from the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse in 1985 and a master's degree in exercise physiology from Arizona State University in 1989.

In addition, he is a certified sports clinical specialist, an orthopaedic clinical specialist by the American Physical Therapy Association, and a certified strength and conditioning specialist. He is a certified USPTA tennis teaching professional, and is the chairman of the USTA National Sport Science Committee.

Todd has conducted and published research primarily on upper extremity athletes, with a specific emphasis on the musculoskeletal adaptations in elite tennis players. He has conducted research and lectured internationally on shoulder and elbow rehabilitation, as well as training techniques to enhance performance and prevent injuries in tennis players.

He is the author of several books, "The Elbow in Sport", "Complete Conditioning for Tennis", "Closed Kinetic Chain Exercise", and Examination of the Shoulder", and is the editor of the second edition of "Knee Ligament Rehabilitation", and co-editor of "The Scientific and Clinical Application of Elastic Resistance".

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June 18, 2006

One Leg Test

Todd Ellenbecker is a Chairman of the USTA Sport Science Committee and is also a physical therapist and clinic director of Physiotherapy Associates Scottsdale Sports Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona. He received his degree in physical therapy from the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse in 1985 and a master's degree in exercise physiology from Arizona State University in 1989.

In addition, he is a certified sports clinical specialist, an orthopaedic clinical specialist by the American Physical Therapy Association, and a certified strength and conditioning specialist. He is a certified USPTA tennis teaching professional, and is the chairman of the USTA National Sport Science Committee.

Todd has conducted and published research primarily on upper extremity athletes, with a specific emphasis on the musculoskeletal adaptations in elite tennis players. He has conducted research and lectured internationally on shoulder and elbow rehabilitation, as well as training techniques to enhance performance and prevent injuries in tennis players.

He is the author of several books, "The Elbow in Sport", "Complete Conditioning for Tennis", "Closed Kinetic Chain Exercise", and Examination of the Shoulder", and is the editor of the second edition of "Knee Ligament Rehabilitation", and co-editor of "The Scientific and Clinical Application of Elastic Resistance".


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June 2, 2006

Shots showing dynamic balance

Lee Couillard, WIlson TEAM Member, USPTA shows different examples of dynamic balance.


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April 30, 2006

Learning Stages

David T. Porter, Ed.D., USPTA Master Professional and Men's and Women's Head Tennis Coach for BYU, Hawaii talks about the 3 learning stages, congnitive; associative and autonomous.


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April 14, 2006

"One to Ten" drill

Dave Porter, USPTA Master Professional, BYU Hawaii with Max Hilkey, USPTA, Chapel Hill, N.C. Max plays an imaginary point. Assisted by Dave Porter, Max has to rate himself on a scale of 1 to 10 on the intensity level played on the point.

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April 12, 2006

"Optimal Performance"

Don Greene, Ph.D, Former Olympic Coach - Serve Tip, How to achieve your "Optimal Perfomance Level"

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